German Musician – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:55:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://schlammpeitziger.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png German Musician – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ 32 32 Artist Hito Steyerl declines Germany’s highest honor, accuses committee of ‘cleaning up diversity’ + more stories https://schlammpeitziger.com/artist-hito-steyerl-declines-germanys-highest-honor-accuses-committee-of-cleaning-up-diversity-more-stories/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/artist-hito-steyerl-declines-germanys-highest-honor-accuses-committee-of-cleaning-up-diversity-more-stories/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:32:34 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/artist-hito-steyerl-declines-germanys-highest-honor-accuses-committee-of-cleaning-up-diversity-more-stories/ Art Industry News is a daily digest of the most important developments from the art world and the art market. Here is what you need to know on Friday, September 17. NEED TO READ Nobody cares about anything that no longer paints – Despite Big Fun Art’s continued appeal for Instagram selfies, it has been […]]]>

Art Industry News is a daily digest of the most important developments from the art world and the art market. Here is what you need to know on Friday, September 17.

NEED TO READ

Nobody cares about anything that no longer paints – Despite Big Fun Art’s continued appeal for Instagram selfies, it has been the humble medium of painting that has inspired collectors to spend over the past two years. As Art Basel approaches, buyers are expected to show their speculative muscles in the white-hot market of dynamic young painters. “People are just overwhelmed by this phenomenon of paintings that can be bought for $ 25,000 and then be worth $ 5 million in a few years,” said anti-trend dealer Jeffrey Deitch. brings a $ 3 million bread house by Urs Fischer. for justice. (Bloomberg)

The Struggle of Myanmar Artists – Myanmar artists are suffering along with the rest of the population under Tatmadaw’s military dictatorship, the worsening Covid-19 crisis and the collapse of the economy. Artist Htein Lin counted 117 artists, mostly from an older generation, who died from the virus. “It reminds me of how intellectuals were all killed by the Khmer Rouge and they lost a generation,” he said. (The arts journal)

The artist Hito Steyerl declines the highest German distinction – The German artist turned down the Federal Cross of Merit to protest the nation’s handling of the pandemic. In a letter published in Die zeit, she said the decision to pick her sounded like an exercise in ‘cleaning up diversity’ for the sake of honor, and explained that she felt the country’s partial lockdown was ‘half baked and never ending’, penalizing unfairly culture and education while allowing business activities to continue. (ARTnews)

Experts say Vinland’s map is a fake – Experts have concluded that the Vinland Map, believed to be a 15th-century map depicting part of the North American coast in southwest Greenland that would have proven that the Normans were the first to discover America, is in fact a fake. Researchers at Yale University, owner of the card since 1965, found that it was “awash in 20th century ink.” (Daily mail)

MOVERS AND FITTERS

TEFAF online sells to museums – Several museums have made their purchases on TEFAF Online, in particular the Rijksprentenkabinet of Amsterdam, which recovered a work of the Venetian school of Nicolaas Teeuwisse OHG, and the Clark Art Institute, which acquired a work of Hortense Haudebourt-Lescot of the 19C gallery. (Daily Artfix)

1-54 announces special projects – Artist Lakwena Maciver will transform the courtyard of Somerset House with large-scale interactive basketball paintings as part of the 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair in London from October 14-17. The fair is also partnering with curator Christine Eyene, who will select the works for display at Christie’s King Street Galleries during the fair. (Press release)

Sim Smith to open new gallery in London – Sim Smith will open a new space in October at 6 Camberwell Passage in south London, marking the gallery’s return to the Camberwell district, where it previously had a space. The first exhibition will feature works by London painter David Surman. (Press release)

NADA opens a project space in New York – The New Art Dealers Alliance has opened a project space in a mall in Manhattan’s Chinatown. The teen space at 75 East Broadway – it’s about the size of an art fair booth – will showcase the work of artists from member galleries based outside of New York City year round. (Hyperallergic)

Artnet Auctions goes to the last frontier – A sale of 1960s NASA photographs had stellar results (get it?) This week, with a value sale rate of 113% and an average transaction value of $ 8,600. The sale was the first of its kind held on the platform, featuring old photographs taken by NASA during space missions. (Press release)

FOR THE LOVE OF ART

The Kitchen Launches $ 28 Million Fundraising Campaign – The New York arts association is seeking to raise $ 28 million over five years to fund the renovation of its historic home on West 19th Street in Chelsea. The Kitchen’s new director, Legacy Russell, is spearheading the campaign, which kicked off on Tuesday with a gala honoring artist Cindy Sherman and musician Debbie Harry. The redesign will add a new gallery space and an artist studio. (Art Forum)

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Study Confirms Stradivari’s Superior Sound Is Due To Varnish https://schlammpeitziger.com/study-confirms-stradivaris-superior-sound-is-due-to-varnish/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/study-confirms-stradivaris-superior-sound-is-due-to-varnish/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 23:30:08 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/study-confirms-stradivaris-superior-sound-is-due-to-varnish/ Enlarge / A 1729 Stradivari known as “Solomon, Ex-Lambert” on display at Christie’s in New York in March 2007. Together with Andrea Amati and Andrea Guarneri, Antonio Stradivari dominated the so-called golden age of violins (c. 1660 to 1750), and the instruments they made remain today the benchmark in terms of acoustic quality. World-renowned cellist […]]]>
Enlarge / A 1729 Stradivari known as “Solomon, Ex-Lambert” on display at Christie’s in New York in March 2007.

Together with Andrea Amati and Andrea Guarneri, Antonio Stradivari dominated the so-called golden age of violins (c. 1660 to 1750), and the instruments they made remain today the benchmark in terms of acoustic quality. World-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma has long favored a Stradivarius instrument, as has violinist Joshua Bell. But scientists have been arguing for years about precisely why these instruments sound so superior. A recent article published in the journal Angewandte Chemie confirms a theory dating back to 2006: the secret lies in the chemicals used to quench wood, including borax, zinc, copper, alum and lime water.

I have written extensively on this subject in the past. The unique (perceived) sound cannot only be due to the geometry of the instrument, although Stradivari’s geometric approach has given us the characteristic shape of the violin. One hypothesis is that Stradivari may have used Alpine spruce that grew during a period of unusually cold weather, which brought the annual growth rings together, making the wood unusually dense. Another dominant theory has to do with varnish: namely that Stradivari used an ingenious cocktail of honey, egg whites and gum arabic from sub-Saharan trees, or perhaps salts or other chemicals.

Then again, the difference can be all in our heads. A player’s instrumentalist preference is very subjective, and there is some evidence of so-called “psychoacoustics” at play: that is, we have become so impressed with the name Stradivarius that ‘it influences how we assess or respond to the sound of any of Stradivarius’ instruments. instruments.

In fact, a 2012 double-blind study of 21 experienced violinists found that most subjects preferred to play the newer instruments; the Stradivarius was last in their preferences. Most of them could not tell the difference between old and new instruments, with no significant correlation between an instrument’s age and its monetary value. “Rather than looking for Stradivari’s ‘secret’, future research might better focus on how violinists rate instruments, what specific playing qualities are most important to them, and how those qualities are. linked to the measurable attributes of instruments, whether old or new, ”the authors concluded.

The theory of varnish dates back to 2006, when Joseph Nagyvary, professor emeritus of biochemistry at Texas A&M University, made headlines with an article in Nature claiming that these are the chemicals used to treat wood, not necessarily wood. himself, who were responsible for it. for the unique sound of a Stradivarius violin. Specifically, these were salts of copper, iron and chromium, all of which are excellent wood preservatives but may also have altered the acoustic properties of the instruments. He based his findings on studies using infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the chemical properties of the back panels of several violins (the back panel is the largest resonant component of the instrument).

Close-up of the sculpture by Antonio Stradivari (1644-1737) on Corso Garibaldi, Cremona, Italy.
Enlarge / Close-up of the sculpture by Antonio Stradivari (1644-1737) on Corso Garibaldi, Cremona, Italy.

Elena Piccini / Fototeca Gilardi / Getty Images

In 2007, East Carolina University physicist George Bissinger used a 3D scanning laser to produce detailed, quantitative measurements of the acoustic properties of several Strad violins, essentially determining how they vibrate to produce these celestial sounds. Bissinger suspended each of the five violins by elastic bands, then hit the wood of the top plate with a small hammer while recording and measuring the vibration patterns with the scanner.

He specifically wanted to measure in-plane and out-of-plane motion: in-plane motion is the source of much of the sound energy, and this turns into out-of-plane motion, which produces the rich tonal sounds that we associate with fine violins. . Additionally, he hired a world-class violinist to play each of the violins used in the study for an hour to familiarize himself with the instruments and then offer subjective notes for each. The musician’s subjective analysis was then compared to the objective acoustic data. The resulting measurements were detailed enough to reconstruct the stiffness properties of the wood used to make the Strads, according to Bissinger.

CT scans

In 2008, Berend Stoel from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands collaborated with a luthier named Terry Borman to perform CT scans of several Strads, as well as several modern instruments for comparison. The objective was to study the density of the woods used, because the differences in density of the wood have an impact on the vibratory efficiency and therefore on the production of sound. Stoel had developed a computer program that noninvasively calculated lung densities in people with emphysema, and he adapted it to study wood densities from CT scans.

There was not much significant difference between the average wood density of the classical and modern violins used in the study. But the differences in density between the wood grains of early and late-growing wood were significantly smaller in classical Cremonian violins compared to modern violins. “Our results clearly document the differences in basic material properties between the woods used by classic Cremona and contemporary creators,” the authors concluded.

Further evidence in favor of Team Varnish comes from a 2016 study by researchers at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA). They studied how the chemical composition, thickness and degree of penetration of a varnish into wood affected the acoustics of the instrument.

As I wrote for Gizmodo in 2016:

They used samples of Norwegian spruce wood cut from the same tree and coated the samples with different types of varnish: two of their own making and two used by German master luthiers. Then, they performed vibration tests of the samples over time, using x-ray tomography to measure the effects.

The researchers found that all varnishes increased the damping capacity of wood, that is, its ability to absorb and stop vibrations. This extra damping, compared to unvarnished wood, leads to a warmer, softer, and aesthetically pleasing sound. The varnishes favored by German luthiers performed slightly better in this regard and also allowed better sound radiation (stronger tones).

A 2017 study by Taiwanese researchers compared the maple used by Stradivarius with modern, high-quality maple wood. Their analysis showed evidence of chemical treatments in the form of aluminum, calcium and copper, among other elements. And thanks to the decomposition over time of a component of wood called hemicellulose, the Stradivari and Guarneri instruments used in the study contained 25% less water than modern instruments. “This is fundamentally important because the less humidity, the brighter the sound,” Nagyvary told The New York Times.

Violinist Adrian Pintea plays a 1729 Stradivari known as the "Salomon, ex-Lambert" in 2007 at Christie's in New York.
Enlarge / Violinist Adrian Pintea played a 1729 Stradivari known as “Solomon, Ex-Lambert” in 2007 at Christie’s in New York.

Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

This latest study analyzes the chemical traces preserved in the maple wood used to make the soundboards of Stradivari and Guarneri instruments. The research involved a rare collection of samples of spruce and Cremona maple woods used by Stradivari, Guarneri and Amati, and the results were then compared to modern spruce and maple woods, as well as ‘to woods of ancient Chinese zithers and less exceptional old European violins. .

They found traces of borax and several metal sulfates in wood samples dating from 1600 to 1750. As David Bressan explained to Forbes:

Borax, also known as sodium borate, is found naturally in evaporite deposits produced by repeated evaporation from seasonal lakes. Borax is still used today in various household laundry and cleaning products, and in the past was also used as an insecticide and fungicide, killing pests. Copper and zinc sulphates, often associated with copper ore, likely served the same purpose. Alum, an evaporite mineral containing sulfur, aluminum, potassium and sodium, was added to the mixture to form a weakly acidic environment in the wood, thereby preventing mold growth. Halite, a common table salt, has been added to control humidity, keeping the wood too dry for germs and fungi, and at the same time preventing deformation of the instrument caused by fluctuations in humidity.

This is good news for Nagyvary, who co-authored this latest article. “This new study reveals that Stradivari and Guarneri had their own proprietary method of treating wood, to which they could have attributed considerable importance,” he told Texas A&M Today. “They might have realized that the special salts they used to impregnate the wood also gave it mechanical strength and beneficial acoustic advantages. These methods were kept secret. There were no patents at that time. . How the wood was handled with chemicals was impossible to guess by visual inspection of the finished product. “

Nagyvary still believes more research is needed to shed light on the link between the chemicals used to treat wood and the sound quality of finished instruments. “First of all, several dozen samples are needed not only from Stradivari and Guarneri, but also from other manufacturers of the golden period (1660-1750) from Cremona, Italy,” he said. “There will have to be better cooperation between the master restorers of old musical instruments, the best manufacturers of our time, and the scientists who often perform the experiments. pro bono in their free time. “

DOI: Angewandte Chemie, 2021. 10.1002 / anie.202105252 (About DOIs).


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Astro Arcade: TheFatRat releases debut studio album ‘PARALLAX’, a collision of gaming and business influences https://schlammpeitziger.com/astro-arcade-thefatrat-releases-debut-studio-album-parallax-a-collision-of-gaming-and-business-influences/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/astro-arcade-thefatrat-releases-debut-studio-album-parallax-a-collision-of-gaming-and-business-influences/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 15:33:33 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/astro-arcade-thefatrat-releases-debut-studio-album-parallax-a-collision-of-gaming-and-business-influences/ by: Farrell Sweeney Sep 16, 2021 Astro Arcade is where the intersection of esports, games and music comes to life. Few things go better together than electronic music and this digital world, so whether it’s a game soundtrack from our favorite artists or an in-game virtual concert series, Astro Arcade is here to help. keep […]]]>

Astro Arcade is where the intersection of esports, games and music comes to life. Few things go better together than electronic music and this digital world, so whether it’s a game soundtrack from our favorite artists or an in-game virtual concert series, Astro Arcade is here to help. keep players and listeners informed as these worlds continue to collide.

German game music icon and music producer TheFatRat is releasing his debut studio album, which features 10 tracks and a range of collaborators. RIELL, Cecilia Gault and Anjulie each have two songlist inclusions while Everen Maxwell and Lindsey Stirling make appearances on the LP. TheFatRat released every single in anticipation of PARALLAXThe full release of, with “Let Love Win” with Anjulie being the final pre-LP offering to complete the set of work.

TheFatRat’s music is featured in games ranging from Dota 2 To Rocket league, and PARALLAX sees the musician take a more commercial approach with certain cuts such as “Hiding in The Blue” while maintaining his playing focus on singles such as “Arcadia”. TheFatRat discussed the name of his album and his intention behind the LP in an official release, stating:

“Parallax is an effect that, simply put, describes how things look differently depending on where we are. The metaphorical meaning of parallax is one of the most fascinating things in life for me. Often we are not aware that the reality we are perceiving is the result of the position from which we are looking. He continues: “We are not even aware that we are looking from a certain position. We think we see things as they are, and then we are surprised when others see them differently. The solution is not to insist on our perception but to take into account the position from which we are looking. The album is about how things change based on how you look at them.

Every song on PARALLAX is free to use on social media for creators and source material will be made public. This mission is true to TheFatRat’s continuing tradition of freely disseminating his songs and their stems to help inspire the many dedicated content creators who follow him, thus strengthening their own passionate endeavors.

PARALLAX is now available through TheFatRat’s own label, The Arcadium.

Tags: anjulie, astro arcade, AstroArcade, Dota2, Everen Maxwell, Lindsey Stirling, parallax, rocket league, arcadium, TheFatRat

Categories: Astro Arcade, Music


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Amy Winehouse Retrospective Lands at London’s Design Museum, and other news – SURFACE https://schlammpeitziger.com/amy-winehouse-retrospective-lands-at-londons-design-museum-and-other-news-surface/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/amy-winehouse-retrospective-lands-at-londons-design-museum-and-other-news-surface/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 08:00:29 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/amy-winehouse-retrospective-lands-at-londons-design-museum-and-other-news-surface/ DESIGN SHIPPING Our daily view of the world through the prism of design. BY EDITORS September 15, 2021 Curator Priya Khanchandani and Winehouse friend Naomi Parry at the unveiling of a mural to advertise the Design Museum’s exhibition. Photograph by Jeff Spicer / Getty Images … The Design Dispatch offers essential news written by experts […]]]>

DESIGN SHIPPING

Our daily view of the world through the prism of design.

BY EDITORS

September 15, 2021

Curator Priya Khanchandani and Winehouse friend Naomi Parry at the unveiling of a mural to advertise the Design Museum’s exhibition. Photograph by Jeff Spicer / Getty Images

The Design Dispatch offers essential news written by experts in the world of design, designed by our dedicated team. Think of it as your cheat sheet for the day in the design delivered to your inbox before you have your coffee. Subscribe now.

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A retrospective of Amy Winehouse’s career will land at the Design Museum in London.

The Design Museum in London is about to open a major retrospective of Amy Winehouse’s career. Instead of focusing on her short but troubled life and tense media presence, curator Priya Khanchandani said the exhibition will focus on Winehouse’s musicality, stylistic influences and fashion sense through personal items such an electric guitar and handwritten notebooks. “It was as if something hadn’t been said about Amy’s story and about her as a serious musician – the way she was reflected in the media had really diminished her legacy,” Khanchandani said. to Guardian. “There is a lot of noise around his story that swallowed him up and I tried to pick up the layers and make sure we were telling the right story.” A major element of the exhibition sees artist Chiara Stephenson designing an installation inspired by the Metropolis studio in which Winehouse recorded; another piece will feature her red Moschino bag and yellow Preen dress. Winehouse fans can also expect new music to be released soon by the singer’s estate.

A Miami developer is preparing to build the tallest tower on the east coast south of New York City.

Planned to rise 1,049 feet, the Brickell neighborhood A bayfront plaza, designed by ODP Architects, will become the tallest skyscraper in the region south of New York. Demolition of the site’s current building is expected to begin in the first half of 2022, and developer FECR says demand is so high that every unit has already been sold, crediting migration from states such as New York and California.

The Australian Islamic Center by Glenn Murcutt. Photograph by Anthony Browell

Australian architect Glenn Murcutt receives the 2021 Praemium Imperiale Award.

Dedicated to the attribution of artistic fields that do not fall under the Nobel Prize, the laureate of the Praemium Imperiale recognizes revolutionary figures in the fields of sculpture, painting, music and architecture and is issued annually by the Japan Art Association. Glenn Murcutt received this year’s award for his contributions to architecture and became the first Australian recipient. As the association noted, Murcutt is an “architect ahead of his time” and “has spent his career creating modest and environmentally friendly buildings rooted in the climate and tradition of his native Australia.”

A symbolic church destroyed on September 11 is being renovated by Santiago Calatrava.

After the collapse of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas and the National Shrine in New York City in the September 11 attacks, Spanish engineer and architect Santiago Calatrava reconstructed the heritage building by channeling influences from orthodoxy and anthropomorphism in architecture. Although its initial rebuilding began in 2015, a lack of funding and delays from the pandemic pushed the opening date back to 2022. With a new cash flow pipeline from the nonprofit Friends of St. Nicholas, the revamped plan is inspired by Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia Grand. Mosque. As Santiago describes it, his vision stems from “the idea of ​​a metamorphosis of the images of the Virgin as a throne of wisdom ‘Sedes sapientiae’ and making it a temple of the Church.

“Sitzengebliebene / Stay Downers” (2017) by Nairy Baghramian at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Photograph by Timo Ohler

Berlin sculptor Nairy Baghramian receives the 2022 Nasher Prize.

Nairy Baghramian, an Iranian-German artist who excels in abstract sculpture work, marries influences from historical art with modern sculpture to explore the nuances of human anatomy. His rich body of work is presented in top-notch galleries, such as Tate Modern in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and his meteoric rise in her field watches her win the Nasher Prize, an award inaugurated by architect Renzo Piano. The delivery ceremony is scheduled for next spring by the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas, Texas. Director Jeremy Strick credits Baghramian’s projects, noting them as “evocative and enigmatic explorations of the body and which probe our propensity for binaries inside and out, inside and out.”

Dread Scott is auctioning off his first NFT of a “White Man for Sale” at Christie’s.

In a study of social theory, the artist Dread scott designed a 70-second looping video of a white man, ready to be bought, standing on top of a block that is being sold as NFT by auction house Christie’s. Scott’s work subverts the traditional hierarchy of slavery as his video reports a white man being ignored on a pedestal by black pedestrians. The main takeaway from the piece, however, is its link with capitalism: Scott draws on American history and slavery to demonstrate the correlation between augmented labor and reward capital. His analysis of the ambivalent system leads him to analyze this social phenomenon in a satirical way: “It’s a really rare opportunity to buy a white man for sale”, explains the artist. “If you have the money to buy one, you should – they don’t come very often.”

“Every day: the first 5,000 days” by Beeple

Today’s Attractive Distractions:

The marvelous of Marcel Dzama moons and suns enliven a Williamsburg metro station.

It turns out that the Donkey the crew has accumulated more than $ 24 million in hospital bills.

This biotech startup has raised millions of dollars to resuscitate woolly mammoths.

For $ 475 you can purchase a TVN ticket experience beeple Viral TVN in person.

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Woman Offaly wows audiences with revolutionary sounds https://schlammpeitziger.com/woman-offaly-wows-audiences-with-revolutionary-sounds/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/woman-offaly-wows-audiences-with-revolutionary-sounds/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 05:00:13 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/woman-offaly-wows-audiences-with-revolutionary-sounds/ Arrive at the Berlin Philharmonic Hall for a regular concert and you’ll find yourself in a large and bright space that can accommodate nearly 2,500 people. Last Sunday, however, the hall seemed smaller, shrouded in intimate darkness that heralded an unusual performance to come. Within minutes of their appearance, five wind musicians from the German […]]]>

Arrive at the Berlin Philharmonic Hall for a regular concert and you’ll find yourself in a large and bright space that can accommodate nearly 2,500 people. Last Sunday, however, the hall seemed smaller, shrouded in intimate darkness that heralded an unusual performance to come.

Within minutes of their appearance, five wind musicians from the German ensemble Musikfabrik – using all kinds of mutes in their instruments – transformed the hall into a haunted house, a deserted factory and so many soundscapes and landscapes. that there were spectators.

All leaned forward, fascinated by the malicious beauty they heard and fascinated by the members of the ensemble interacting more like a troupe of actors than musicians. Even the sacred Berlin Hall seemed intrigued by the prepared piano and harps, rising clarinets and violin strings played to their limits.

Imagine three circles – musician, scientist and engineer – and where they intersect you will find her composing, thinking, tinkering and teaching.

Sitting in the room, almost out of sight, is the Irish composer responsible for it all: Offaly-born Ann Cleare, a talent in demand around the world, especially in mainland Europe. Next year in Munich will see the premiere of a Brexit opera she’s writing with Scottish writer AL Kennedy, but later.

In a Berlin café two days after the concert, we have a lot to say to each other. Above all: how important is it to hear your music performed at the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra?

She laughed, saying she tried not to think about it during rehearsals, instead focusing on the musicians in order to get the most out of the works she was hearing for the first time since early 2020.

“I couldn’t have asked for a better group of musicians or better conditions – acoustically it’s superb,” says Cleare (37), cheerful, gentle and still committed. “There are only a handful of places like this in the world.”

Ann Cleare and Winrich Hopp, artistic director of Musikfest Berlin

No one else in the world makes music like Ann Cleare. Imagine three circles – musician, scientist and engineer – and where they intersect you will find her composing, thinking, tinkering and teaching.

At Trinity College Dublin, she teaches music and media technology, not in the music department but with engineers.

“You don’t have baroque or classical engineers, they are very forward looking on how to be innovative, sustainable, imaginative and that mindset suits me so much more,” she says. “I’m interested in the sounds of the moment. “

Growing up outside of Shinrone, Co Offaly, Cleare remembers his father as a “handsome ballad singer” and regular visits from his poet friends. When she started music lessons at the age of seven, her eagerness to learn Western classical and traditional Irish music was quickly overtaken by an urge to escape her tonal and rhythmic limitations. Instead, she wanted to explore what she heard around her: the rhythms of agriculture, the mud of the bog, the charge of a magnetic field.

When Cleare is working, she makes field recordings or improvises with objects or instruments, exploring their material characteristics and seeing how far she can go.

Studying music at UCC, she caught the songwriting virus by chance in her sophomore year when she was hospitalized with a literal virus – viral pneumonia. When she returned to college, she had fallen so far behind other classes that composition was the best way to avoid repeating a year.

Encouraged by her teacher, John Godfrey, composer and member of the Crash Ensemble, Cleare realized that composition could be whatever she wanted it to be.

“I thought the composition was going to be about writing fugues, so it was mind-boggling to me that you could create your own system of governance,” she says. “It didn’t necessarily have to be this white male Western tradition that I felt no connection with.”

Was it like realizing that there is more than black tea out there? “Exactly. Previously there was only Barry’s Tea and now there were all these mind blowing teas.

Composer Ann Cleare enjoys an encore after a performance of her work at the Berlin Philharmonic last weekend.  Photography: Astrid Ackermann

Ann Cleare enjoys an encore after a performance of her work at the Berlin Philharmonic this past weekend. Photography: Astrid Ackermann

When Cleare is working, she makes field recordings or improvises with objects or instruments, exploring their material characteristics and seeing how far she can go. She knows the center she is aiming for in a new piece and has a clear structure, but keeps it open to a multiplicity of interpretations. Rather than getting lost in the intellectual ambition of some from modern music, it is aimed at a diverse audience.

“I really want people to get it, I’m not trying to alienate anyone. I’m still wondering: did I give the first listener enough time to get this and connect, and is there enough time for multiple listeners to keep learning if they come back? “

Germany played a crucial role in his career. It was here that she gave the first real concert of her work in 2007 and Sunday’s concert took place as part of the prestigious Berlin Musikfest.

Winrich Hopp, artistic director of the festival, said he was “just delighted” when German composer Enno Poppe recommended a program of works by Ann Cleare.

Just as Brexit rewired the Irish economy, it also recalibrates the country’s cultural orientation

“His music is unique and incomparable,” says Hopp. “She has a way of slowing down time, of bringing things back to a slow, natural spectacle, it’s like listening to nature.”

Ann Cleare was not the only Irish influence at this year’s Musikfest: German composer Heiner Goebbels premiered a new work, “A House of Call”, based on texts by James Joyce and the late Samuel Beckett.

Next year, Cleare will be back in Germany with a commission from the Munich Biennale. The Little Lives, an opera set to a libretto by AL Kennedy, tells the story of four people trapped in a Scottish city park by a guard who keeps changing the reason for their imprisonment.

“It’s a meditation on those years of uncertainty, constantly wondering what’s going to happen, people being fed information and misinformation, feeling like pawns,” says Cleare. “The park warden is constantly manipulating the situation. He takes inspiration from Boris Johnson, constantly telling everyone what they want to hear and changing what they say.

Nervous at the idea of ​​working on her first political piece, Cleare is still working on the score. A key component, she says, will be the sound of the fish rippling through the water that she recorded on a hydrophone.

“Once processed and amplified, the ripple changes from weak to strong,” she says. “It’s an oscillating sound, like the drone of anxiety you get from time to time.”

Just as Brexit reconfigured the Irish economy, it also recalibrates the country’s cultural orientation. Huge pressure for closer cultural contacts in all artistic fields is underway from the Irish Embassy in Berlin.

“There is so much interest and fertile ground in Germany, it is the epicenter of contemporary music,” explains Candice Gordon, cultural affairs manager at the embassy. “As Ireland is in a phase of growing new music, there is so much room for the future here. “

Cleare suggests that, to be successful, Ireland’s cultural push will need to reflect the Germans’ long-term approach to planning and funding. For her, Ireland’s ad hoc and short-term approach reflects the absence of the arts in the lives of many Irish. Not everyone is as privileged as she, she says, to have parents who could afford private lessons.

“Music is not fundamental to the thinking of Irish politicians, it never has been. I think it’s a question of getting to a younger stage, that it’s a right to be able to explore the arts as a young person.


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Today in history https://schlammpeitziger.com/today-in-history/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/today-in-history/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 05:03:45 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/today-in-history/ Today in history Today is Wednesday, September 8, the 251st day of 2021. There are 114 days left in the year. Today’s highlight in history: On September 8, 1565, a Spanish expedition established the first permanent European settlement in North America at present-day St. Augustine, Florida. To this date : In 1504, Michelangelo’s imposing marble […]]]>

Today in history

Today is Wednesday, September 8, the 251st day of 2021. There are 114 days left in the year.

Today’s highlight in history:

On September 8, 1565, a Spanish expedition established the first permanent European settlement in North America at present-day St. Augustine, Florida.

To this date :

In 1504, Michelangelo’s imposing marble statue of David was unveiled to the public in Florence, Italy.

In 1664, the Dutch ceded New Amsterdam to the British, who renamed it New York.

In 1761, the King of England George III married Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz a few hours after meeting her for the first time.

In 1892 a first version of “The Pledge of Allegiance”, written by Francis Bellamy, appeared in “The Youth’s Companion”. He said: “I swear allegiance to my flag and to the Republic it represents, a nation, indivisible, with freedom and justice for all.

In 1900, Galveston, Texas was hit by a hurricane that killed approximately 8,000 people.

In 1935, Senator Huey P. Long, a Democrat from Louisiana, was shot and fatally injured inside the Louisiana State Capitol; he died two days later. (The assailant was identified as Dr. Carl Weiss, who was shot and killed by Long’s bodyguards.)

In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared a “limited national emergency” in response to the outbreak of war in Europe.

In 1941, the 900-day siege of Leningrad by German forces began during World War II.

In 1943, during World War II, General Dwight D. Eisenhower announced the surrender of Italy; Nazi Germany denounced Italy’s decision as a cowardly act.

In 1964, public schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia reopened after being closed for five years by officials trying to prevent court-ordered racial desegregation.

In 1974, President Gerald R. Ford granted former President Richard Nixon a “complete, free and absolute pardon” for his entire term.

In 2019, Rafael Nadal resisted a strong comeback attempt to win his 19th Grand Slam title in a five-set US Open final against Daniil Medvedev.

Ten Years Ago: Addressing a joint session of Congress, President Barack Obama challenged a reluctant Congress to urgently adopt a larger-than-expected $ 450 billion jobs plan to “shake up a stalled economy ”. Ten oil workers were forced to abandon a paralyzed 94-foot research vessel in the Gulf of Mexico and cram into a life raft during Tropical Storm Nate; by the time rescuers arrived three days later, three of the men had died and a fourth later died in a hospital.

Five years ago: California and federal regulators fined Wells Fargo a combined $ 185 million, alleging bank employees illegally opened millions of unauthorized accounts for their clients in order to achieve goals ambitious sales. U.S. aviation safety officials have taken the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new model of Samsung smartphone, the Galaxy Note 7, during flights following numerous reports of fire machines. Greta Zimmer Friedman, identified as the woman in an iconic photo seen kissing an ecstatic sailor in Times Square celebrating the end of World War II, has died in Richmond, Virginia at the age of 92.

A year ago: The hamlet of Berry Creek at the foot of the northern California foothills was largely destroyed in what would be the deadliest of the wildfires that ravage much of the state; it killed 16 people. More than a dozen California firefighters attempting to protect a fire station in rugged mountains were engulfed in flames; several were injured while deploying emergency shelters. Students across the country have encountered computer glitches as they begin the school year with online home education due to the coronavirus. The British government has banned gatherings of more than six people in England as authorities try to control new daily coronavirus infections.

Today’s Birthdays: Ventriloquist Willie Tyler is 81. Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Is 80 years old. Actor Alan Feinstein is 80 years old. Pop singer Sal Valentino (The Beau Brummels) is 79 years old. Author Ann Beattie is 74 years old. Former Secretary of Defense James Mattis is 71 years old. Cajun singer Zachary Richard (ree-SHARD ‘) is 71 years old. Musician Will Lee is 69 years old. Actress Heather Thomas is 64 years old. Singer Aimee Mann is 61 years old. Pop musician David Steele (Fine Young Cannibals) is 61 years old. Actor Thomas Kretschmann is 59 years old. Gospel singer Darlene Zschech (chehk) is 56 years old. Alternative country singer Neko (NEE’-koh) Case is 51 years old. TV personality Brooke Burke is 50 years old. Actor Martin Freeman is 50 years old. Actor David Arquette is 50 years old. Kennedy is 49 years old. Rock musician Richard Hughes (Keane) is 46 years old. Actor Larenz Tate is 46 years old. Actor Nathan Corddry is 44 years old. The R&B singer Pink is 42 years old. Singer-songwriter Eric Hutchinson is 41 years old. Actor Jonathan Taylor Thomas is 40 years old. Rapper Wiz Khalifa is 34 years old. Actor Gaten Matarazzo (TV: ‘Stranger Things’) is 19 years old.


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Gazi Mustafa Kemal opened the Sivas Congress https://schlammpeitziger.com/gazi-mustafa-kemal-opened-the-sivas-congress/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/gazi-mustafa-kemal-opened-the-sivas-congress/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 21:54:04 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/gazi-mustafa-kemal-opened-the-sivas-congress/ Acti of the Congress Gazi Mustafa Kemal Sivas September 4 is the 247th (248th in leap years) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. The number of days remaining until the end of the year is 118. Railways September 4, 1913 The construction privilege of the Samsun-Sivas line under construction is granted to […]]]>
Acti of the Congress Gazi Mustafa Kemal Sivas

September 4 is the 247th (248th in leap years) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. The number of days remaining until the end of the year is 118.

Railways

  • September 4, 1913 The construction privilege of the Samsun-Sivas line under construction is granted to the French company Régie Générale. The agreement was ratified in 1914. When the company did not start construction due to the war, the Ottoman state ignored the privilege.
  • September 4, 1942 A delegation from the Turkish Railways visits German Transport Minister Dorpmüller.

Olaylar

  • 476 – The Western Roman Empire comes to an end when Romulus Augustus, the last ruler of the Western Roman Empire, is deposed by Odoacre, the Germanic leader who declared himself King of Italy.
  • 1521 – Siege of İlyaki: Following the siege led by Kara Mahmut Reis, the island of İlyaki is conquered.
  • 1781 – Los Angeles was founded by people settled in the area by the Spaniards.
  • 1870 – In France, III. The Republic is proclaimed.
  • 1885 – Self-service is first introduced in New York.
  • 1886 – After nearly 30 years of war, Apache Chief Geronimo visits Arizona.
  • 1888 – George Eastman markets the name Kodak and patents his camera using roll film.
  • 1919 – Gazi Mustafa Kemal opens the Congress of Sivas.
  • 1922 – Turkish War of Independence: the Turkish army recaptured Sarıgöl, Buldan and Bigadiç under Greek occupation.
  • 1932 – World Peace Conference convened in Vienna.
  • 1935 – Istanbul telephone company began to operate on behalf of the government.
  • 1936 – British Sovereign VIII. Edward visited Atatürk in Istanbul.
  • 1939 – All foodstuffs are banned from export.
  • 1941 – II. WWII: For the first time, an American ship is attacked by a German submarine. USS ship name Rig’of.
  • 1944 – II. Second World War: the Allies seize Brussels and Antwerp.
  • 1950 – The Beetle Bailey cartoon series, known as Hasbi Tembeler in Turkey, is first released in comic book form.
  • 1956 – The “IBM RAMAC 305” is introduced, the first commercial computer to use a magnetic disk as a storage device.
  • 1957 – African-American Civil Rights Movement: -Little Rock Crisis- The Governor of Arkansas summons the National Guard to prevent black students from enrolling at Central High.
  • 1963 – Swiss Airlines airliner crashes near Dürrenäsch, Switzerland; 80 people died.
  • 1964 – Indonesian government bans Beatles-style haircuts.
  • 1970 – Erdal İnönü becomes rector of the Middle East Technical University.
  • 1970 – In Chile, the socialist leader Salvador Allende is elected president.
  • 1971 – An Alaska Airlines Boeing 727 crashes near Juneau, Alaska, killing 111 people.
  • 1972 – 1972 Summer Olympics: Mark Spitz wins his 7th swimming gold medal, breaking the record for the first athlete to win 7 medals in a single Olympic Games.
  • 1975 – Bulent Ecevit’s election bus is stoned in Elazig; 50 wounded, 57 detained.
  • 1981 – The National Security Council approves a reduction in detention from 90 days to 45 days.
  • 1988 – Floods in Bangladesh: 300 dead, 20 million homeless.
  • 1989 – Turkey’s first sports newspaper photosporesbegan its editorial life.
  • 1991 – The People’s Labor Party (HEP) agrees with the Populist Social Democratic Party (SHP) and decides to cooperate in the elections.
  • 1993 – Democracy Party (DEP) deputy Mehmet Sincar is killed in Batman.
  • 1996 – Oral Çelik, one of the suspects in the murder of Abdi İpekçi, is extradited to Turkey from Switzerland. Çelik was arrested on September 16 by the court, after which he was expelled after 17 years.
  • 1996 – Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) militants attack a military camp in Colombia’s Guaviare region, killing at least 130 people in three weeks of clashes.
  • 1997 – 7 people died and 192 people were injured in three large explosions in the center of the Jerusalem bazaar. Hamas claimed responsibility for the attack.
  • 1998 – Two doctoral students at Google, Stanford; It was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin.
  • 2008 – The Rights and Equality Party is founded under the leadership of retired Major General Osman Pamukoğlu.

births

  • 973 – Biruni, Persian astronomer (died 1051)
  • 1383 – VIII. Amadeus, Duke of Savoy – known as Felice V (1439-1449) (d. 1451) as the last anti-pope
  • 1563 – Wanli, 13th Emperor of the Ming Dynasty (died 1620)
  • 1768 – François-Auguste-René Chateaubriand, French writer and diplomat (died 1848)
  • 1809 Juliusz Słowacki, Polish poet (died 1849)
  • 1824 – Anton Bruckner, Austrian composer (died 1896)
  • 1850 – Luigi Cadorna, Italian general and marshal (died 1928)
  • 1869 – Karl Seitz, Austrian politician and statesman (d.1950)
  • 1888 – Oskar Schlemmer, German painter, sculptor, designer and choreographer of the Bauhaus school (died 1943)
  • 1891 – Fridolin von Senger und Etterlin, German soldier (died 1963)
  • 1891 – Fritz Todt, German engineer, general and founder of the Todt Organization (died 1942)
  • 1896 – Antonin Artaud, French playwright, poet and theater actor (died 1948)
  • 1901 – Ahmet Kutsi Tecer, Turkish poet and playwright (died 1967)
  • 1906 – Max Delbrück, German biologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology (died 1981)
  • 1908 – Edward Dmytryk, American director (died 1999)
  • 1908 – Richard Wright, African-American writer of short stories, novels and essays, poet (died 1960)
  • 1913 Kenzo Tange, Japanese architect (died 2005)
  • 1913 – Stanford Moore, American biochemist and Nobel laureate (died 1982)
  • 1913 Kenzō Tange, Japanese architect (died 2005)
  • 1917 – Henry Ford II, businessman, son of Edsel Ford and grandson of Henry Ford (died 1987)
  • 1925 – Forrest Carter, American author (died 1979)
  • 1927 – John McCarthy, American computer scientist (died 2011)
  • 1928 – Dick York, American actor (died 1992)
  • 1934 – Clive Granger, Welsh economist (died 2009)
  • 1934 – Jan Švankmajer, Czech surrealist artist, animator, director, director
  • 1942 – Raymond Floyd, American golfer
  • 1944 – Tony Atkinson, British scholar and economist (died 2017)
  • [1945–KandemirKondukdramaturgeetscénaristeturc[1945–KandemirKondukdramaturgeetscénaristeturc
  • 1946 – Gary Duncan, American rock singer and guitarist (died 2019)
  • 1949 – Tom Watson, American golfer
  • 1950 – Aleksandar Berček, Serbian actor
  • 1951 – Judith Ivey, American actress and director
  • 1953 – Fatih Terim, Turkish sportsman
  • 1956 – Blackie Lawless, American musician
  • 1960 – Damon Wayans is an American comedian, actor, screenwriter and producer.
  • 1962 – Shinya Yamanaka, Japanese doctor and researcher
  • 1969 – Giorgi Margvelashvili, Georgian scholar and politician
  • 1969 – Sasha, Welsh-born DJ and producer
  • 1974 – Oğuz Aksaç, Turkish folk music artist
  • 1975 – Mark Ronson, English DJ, guitarist, singer and music producer
  • 1977 – Lucie Silvas, singer-songwriter, composer, pianist
  • 1979 – Yasemin d’Ankara, Turkish singer
  • 1980 – Max Greenfield, American actor
  • 1981 – Beyoncé, American singer and actress
  • 1981 – Lacey Mosley, American singer
  • 1982 – Whitney Cummings, American comedian, actress, filmmaker and podcaster
  • 1984 – Camila Bordonaba, Argentine actress and model
  • 1985 – Raúl Albiol, Spanish defender
  • 1986 – Jaclyn Hales, American actress
  • 1990 – Olha Harlan, Ukrainian fencer
  • 1990 – Stefanía Fernández, Venezuelan model
  • 1992 – Hanna Schwamborn, German actress
  • 1993 – Yannick Carrasco, Belgian national footballer
  • 1996 – Mizuki Hayashi, Japanese football player

Armed

  • 626 – Gaozu, founder and first emperor of the Tang Dynasty of China (born in 566)
  • 1063 – Tugrul Bey, founder of the Great Seljuk State (born in 990)
  • 1323 – Kegen Khan is the 5th Yuan Dynasty and Emperor of China. (born in 1302)
  • 1342 – Anna, empress of the Empire of Trebizond from July 17, 1341 to September 4, 1342
  • 1522 – Kara Mahmut Reis, Turkish sailor (born?)
  • 1821 – José Miguel Carrera, South American national hero and Chilean politician (born 1785)
  • 1836 – Aaron Burr, 3rd Vice President of the United States (born 1756)
  • 1907 – Edvard Grieg, Norwegian composer (born 1843)
  • 1944 – Erich Fellgiebel, German general (involved in the July 20 assassination attempt against Hitler) (executed) (born 1886)
  • 1951 – Louis Adamic, American journalist and author (born 1899)
  • 1963 – Robert Schuman, French politician (born 1886)
  • 1965 – Albert Schweitzer, French physician, theologian, philosopher, musician and Nobel Peace Prize laureate b. 1875)
  • 1965 – Mahmut Moralı, Turkish theater and film actor (City Theater artist) (born 1902)
  • 1967 – Ali Mümtaz Arolat, Turkish poet (born 1897)
  • 1985 – Gabriel Allaf, spiritual leader of the ancient Syriac community
  • 1985 – George O’Brien, American actor (born 1899)
  • 1989 – Georges Simenon, Belgian writer (born in 1903)
  • 1990 – Irene Dunne, American actress (born 1898)
  • 1990 – Turan Dursun, Turkish writer and thinker (born 1934)
  • 1991 – Henri de Lubac, Catholic theologian (born 1896)
  • 1993 – Mehmet Sincar, Turkish politician (born 1953)
  • 1993 – Hervé Villechaize, French actor (born in 1943)
  • 1997 – Aldo Rossi, Italian architect and designer (born 1931)
  • 2003 – Tibor Varga, Hungarian violinist (born in 1921)
  • 2006 – Giacinto Facchetti, Italian football player (born 1942)
  • 2006 – Steve Irwin, Austrian documentary maker (born 1962)
  • 2011 – Mino Martinazzoli, Italian politician (born in 1931)
  • 2011 – Hakkı Ögelman, Turkish astronomer and teacher (born 1940)
  • 2013 – Ferdinand Biwersi, former German football referee (born 1934)
  • 2014 – Gustavo Cerati is a singer, songwriter, songwriter and rock producer (born 1959)
  • 2014 – Joan Rivers, American actress, comedian, screenwriter, producer and presenter (born 1933)
  • 2015 – Sylvie Joly, French actress and comedian (born in 1934)
  • 2018 – Marijan Beneš is a Yugoslav-Bosnian boxer (born 1951)
  • 2018 – István Bethlen, Hungarian economist and politician (born 1946)
  • 2018 – Bill Daily, American actor (born 1927)
  • 2018 – Christopher Lawford, American writer, actor, producer and political activist (born 1955)
  • 2019 – Abbas Abdulla, Azerbaijani poet (born 1940)
  • 2019 – Edgardo Andrada, former Argentine footballer (born 1939)
  • 2019 – Roger Etchegaray, French cardinal (born in 1922)
  • 2019 – Kylie Rae Harris, American country singer, musician and songwriter (born 1989)
  • 2019 – Tevfik Kış, Turkish wrestler and trainer (born 1934)
  • 2019 – Dan Warner, American musician, record producer and songwriter (born 1970)
  • 2020 – Lloyd Cadena, Filipino vlogger, radio personality and author (born 1993)
  • 2020 – Annie Cordy, Belgian actress and singer (born in 1928)
  • 2020 – Dmitry Svetushkin, Moldovan chess player (born 1980)
  • 2020 – Joe Williams, politician and physician who served as Prime Minister of the Cook Islands for four months in 1999 (born 1934)


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Top four things about the IE 100 PRO headphones from Sennheiser https://schlammpeitziger.com/top-four-things-about-the-ie-100-pro-headphones-from-sennheiser/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/top-four-things-about-the-ie-100-pro-headphones-from-sennheiser/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/top-four-things-about-the-ie-100-pro-headphones-from-sennheiser/ For decades, in-ear monitors have symbolized a milestone in the career of a performing musician or studio pro. This is mainly due to their relative exclusivity – for a very long time getting your hands on a set of headphones meant spending a lot of money. This has led to countless musicians instead relying on […]]]>

For decades, in-ear monitors have symbolized a milestone in the career of a performing musician or studio pro. This is mainly due to their relative exclusivity – for a very long time getting your hands on a set of headphones meant spending a lot of money. This has led to countless musicians instead relying on the lousy or non-existent internal fallback monitors available in their local pubs and ad hoc studios.

Cheapo earbuds eventually surfaced, but using them was generally not a risk to take – if the earbuds are uncomfortable or give a shaky signal, then your performance will almost certainly be derailed. However, with the arrival of Sennheiser’s IE 100 PRO in-ear headphones, musicians no longer have to choose between rotten tuck-in shims or burn a hole in their savings.

The German brand Sennheiser is one of the most innovative, reliable and user-friendly names in the manufacture of headphones. My daily listening improved exponentially once I got my hands on a pair of PXC 550 cordless cans – it was like being given the key to Plato’s real sound world.

The IE 100 PRO and IE 100 PRO Wireless headphones are likely to deliver a similar transformational experience for concerts and music recording. Don’t believe us? Here are the four best things about these revolutionary in-ear headphones.

The IE 100 PRO sit comfortably for long periods of time

Image credit: Sennheiser

Quality, dynamic and consistent sound is what you are looking for from a pair of headphones. But it won’t mean much if the earplugs don’t feel right in the ear. I’m sure we’ve all been to concerts where the musicians on stage were constantly playing with their ears, trying to get them to sit properly.

It was for this reason that Sennheiser set out to produce earplugs that would fit comfortably in each ear cup. The IE 100 PRO come with a range of different headphone sizes. There are silicone tips in small, medium and large and memory foam tips in medium. The design of each has been optimized through analyzes of hundreds of ear shapes.

The result is a set of headphones that support very little weight no matter how long they are in the ear. To paraphrase Chuang Tzu, “When the ear cups fit, you forget the ear”.

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The dynamic range is immense

Image credit: Sennheiser

Clarity and precision are crucial when it comes to in-ear headphones. With the IE 100 PRO, Sennheiser delivers clear, nuanced sound with exceptional dynamic range for the price of the shelf.

Although the IE 100 PRO are not equipped with noise canceling technology, the earplugs are designed to provide significant protection against outside noise. The durability of this design feature is evident when using the IE 100 PRO as studio monitors, especially for production and mixing.

But what’s more impressive is the ability of these headphones in a live performance setting. Historically, the noisier the environment, the greater the risk of in-ear sound distortion. But Sennheiser developed the IE 100 PRO with the specific intention of removing such a drop in quality.

As a result, we can confirm that the sound remains clear and free from distortion even when IEs are pushed hard to compete with live drums and guitars.

These premium in-ear headphones can double as everyday headphones

Image credit: Sennheiser

We are living in a wireless headphone revolution: Bluetooth-enabled wireless headphones now dominate the streets and public transport of major cities around the world. By upgrading to Sennheiser’s IE 100 PRO wireless model, your premium headphones can double as your everyday headphones.

To do this, simply unplug the standard cable from the IE 100 PROs and plug in the lightweight, semi-wireless Bluetooth connector cable instead. The flexibility of this product has an additional advantage: with the possibility of changing cables inscribed in the design, the risk of breaking the headset wiring near the earpiece is greatly reduced.

When going wireless, there is always a short strap that extends comfortably from the ear hook around the neck. In addition to making earphone tracking easy, the strap includes a built-in microphone and volume control for music and calls.

With ten hours of battery life, you can use the IE 100 PRO wireless headphones to listen to podcasts and music on the go, watch movies at home, or talk on the phone.

Reasonable price is an understatement

Image credit: Sennheiser

Standard IE 100 PROs cost around AUD $ 179. They are available in clear, red and black and come with a straight cable and a cleverly designed ear hook. The box also includes the aforementioned variety of ear tip sizes, a cleaning tool, and a carrying pouch.

For an additional AUD $ 90, you can get the IE 100 PRO wireless headset, which includes all the features and accessories of standard IEs as well as the IE PRO BT connection cable and the corresponding USB-C charger.

You can buy the BT connector cable separately if you decide to upgrade the track. However, you will save around $ 90 AUD by choosing the wireless option up front. Either way, the IE 100 PRO delivers professional sound and unparalleled user experience without breaking the bank.


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“A Happy Accident:” How a New Species of Centipede Was Named After a Floyd County Artist https://schlammpeitziger.com/a-happy-accident-how-a-new-species-of-centipede-was-named-after-a-floyd-county-artist/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/a-happy-accident-how-a-new-species-of-centipede-was-named-after-a-floyd-county-artist/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 22:33:21 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/a-happy-accident-how-a-new-species-of-centipede-was-named-after-a-floyd-county-artist/ FLOYD COUNTY, Virginia. – Of all the creatures and things in the world, having a centipede named after you is not something that many people think of. It seems like a once in a lifetime deal, but it happened to a woman in Floyd County. That woman is Ruth Neumann, an artist and musician better […]]]>

FLOYD COUNTY, Virginia. – Of all the creatures and things in the world, having a centipede named after you is not something that many people think of. It seems like a once in a lifetime deal, but it happened to a woman in Floyd County.

That woman is Ruth Neumann, an artist and musician better known as Starroot.

As crazy as it sounds, it’s not that strange that something like this happens to Starroot, someone who loves and appreciates nature and who lives right in the beautiful valleys of Floyd County.

Starroot with his art (Star root)

The story begins in April 2014 when Tony DiMeglio, a Virginia Tech graduate student at the time who was studying termites, was examining his soil for research.

“He asked, ‘Can I bring my friend from Virginia Tech? He’s a centipede researcher. Because you might have some interesting land for him to search, ”Starroot recalls.

Of course, Starroot said yes, and Dr Jackson Means is coming, who has dedicated his career to learning centipedes.

A d

While he was preparing his doctorate. at Virginia Tech, he took a review on a kind of centipede called Nannaria which was started in the 1960s by the late Dr. Richard Hoffman, former curator at the Virginia Museum of Natural History.

Means said he found Hoffman’s collection at Virginia Tech and borrowed it to continue studying more on Nannaria. He called it the “impetus” of it all.

“It’s a group of centipedes that are small and not well studied at all. There are tons of species in the Appalachians and there were only 18 known species and after my review I added 35 more species and two more in another post, ”Means said. “And there is still more to discover.”

In October 2014, Means and DiMeglio visited the Starroot property, which was full of untouched land with various insects and arthropods to discover.

A d

“I just wanted to collect anywhere because these things don’t fly, they’re blind, they’ve been in these places and ravines for millennia,” Means recalls. “The point is, the Starroot ownership was totally new. Hoffman didn’t have any in his collection, so it was a fluke.

Means, a myriapodologist now working at the Virginia Museum of Natural History, successfully discovered a new species of Nannaria while on the property of Starroot.

A photo of the Starroot property in Floyd County (Star root)

“He came to my land and wandered around for a few hours and he thought he had discovered a new species but said it might take years,” Starroot said.

Indeed, the completion of the Nannaria the revision took almost seven years as more and more species of this genus were found.

As he was found on his land, he decided to give the new species the name Starroot: Nannaria stellaradix. Means said he named it after his contribution in allowing the discovery to happen in the first place.

A d

“When [Dr. Jackson Means] contacted me and I was like “Really we have the new species” I yelled at my husband because I was really beside myself because I didn’t really expect this to happen. executed. I never thought that a new species would be found on my land! she explained.

Starroot, who comes from a German family full of doctors and scientists, said she was shocked at the news but extremely excited for it to happen.

The first thing she did when she found out that a new species of centipede was going to be named after her? She emailed her family.

“I instantly emailed them and said, ‘I have nothing to do with science, but guess what happened? And they just couldn’t believe it, ”she said. “I was so different from them! They are all scientists, and I was the only artist, musician, therapist in the family.

The musician said her brother, who is an expert on dragonflies, was just as excited and joked that he should focus on finding centipedes.

A d

Although months have passed since Starroot found out she had a new species of centipede named after her, her enthusiasm for the discovery has not waned.

“There is so much nature in Floyd and the Blue Ridge Mountains with little destroyed,” Starroot said. “And the centipede has been researched, but not like that, not excessively. It takes people like Dr. Jackson Means to really do this research and find them. It’s just amazing! I’m really impressed.

“Starroot is not a scientist. She’s an artist, an incredibly talented artist, but she clearly values ​​nature and science and what science can provide us, ”Means said. “It’s just a great example of how citizen science can really help [scientists] outside.”

To learn more about Nannaria stellaradix, Click here.

Copyright 2021 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.


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Taylor provides update on COVID, suggests fence guards get vaccinated https://schlammpeitziger.com/taylor-provides-update-on-covid-suggests-fence-guards-get-vaccinated/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/taylor-provides-update-on-covid-suggests-fence-guards-get-vaccinated/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 12:21:14 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/taylor-provides-update-on-covid-suggests-fence-guards-get-vaccinated/ Slipknot frontman Corey Taylor revealed late last week that he tested positive for COVID-19 and felt “very, very sick.” He feels better now, but still isn’t clear. Through a video update, he urged fans to get the shot, saying: “I shudder to think how bad it would have been. [without the vaccine]. “ “Hi everyone. […]]]>

Slipknot frontman Corey Taylor revealed late last week that he tested positive for COVID-19 and felt “very, very sick.” He feels better now, but still isn’t clear. Through a video update, he urged fans to get the shot, saying: “I shudder to think how bad it would have been. [without the vaccine]. “

“Hi everyone. Just wanted to give you an update,” Taylor said at the top of the video post shared on Twitter (seen below).

“First of all, I hope everyone is okay. Second, I’m out of the woods. I’m still [COVID] positive, but the fever is gone, the aches are gone. I sweat everything. I’m still crowded, but I’m making progress slowly but surely. It shouldn’t be too long before I test negative. So, I mean, it’s awesome, ”he revealed.

Grateful for all the support he received after his diagnosis became public, Taylor added: “I wanted to say thank you very much to everyone who sent their best wishes and to all my family and friends who reached out. . You have no idea how much that means to me. “

The singer also used the time to urge others to get vaccinated while praising the positive effect it has had on his own health over the past few days.

“I also want to say that because I was vaccinated I really believe that is what helped me get through the break. I mean, this is the worst I have ever been sick from my If I hadn’t been vaccinated, I shudder to think how bad it would have been. But because I had that little bit of extra protection, man, it definitely helped me get through it. So , go, go, go. If you’re still on the fence [about getting the vaccine], I’m telling you right now, it’s the best thing you can do for yourself, ”Taylor explained.

He signed: “Count the days, and I hope I will see you soon.” OK ? Take care of yourself. Stay safe.

Taylor is one of the many rock and metal musicians who have contracted COVID-19 in recent weeks, either on the road or in their day-to-day lives.

Former Trouble singer and doom metal icon Eric Wagner died of COVID pneumonia after being admitted to hospital last week, Vio-Lence singer Sean Killian was recently hospitalized with COVID-19 and Jonathan Davis from Korn, Frank Hannon from Tesla, Rickey Medlocke from Lynyrd Skynyrd, Sebastian Bach, Bruce Dickinson from Iron Maiden, Leigh Kakaty from Pop Evil, Dee Snider from Twisted Sister and Matt Heafy from Trivium have all tested positive for COVID-19. since early July.

According to John Hopkins University and Medicine, the United States has reached 3.4 million new COVID-19 infections in the past 28 days with 18,888 deaths attributed to the disease. Nearly 17 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the same time frame as infection rates climb rapidly.

Since the start of the pandemic, the United States has the highest number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 37.9 million (as of August 24), the most in the world with more than 5 million with an average of one case positive for 8.6 people living in the country.

Yesterday (August 23), the FDA removed the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine from the emergency use list and gave it full approval for people 16 years of age and older in the United States.

Read about the myths debunked about the different vaccines available here.

Watch Slipknot on the Knotfest Roadshow Tour with Killswitch Engage, FEVER 333 and Code Orange this fall on these dates.

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See Loudwire’s picks for the 66 best metal albums of the 2010s.



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