Performance Artist – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 11:15:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://schlammpeitziger.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Performance Artist – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ 32 32 “The Nutcracker” at the Philadelphia Academy of Music and more dance for fall 2021 https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-nutcracker-at-the-philadelphia-academy-of-music-and-more-dance-for-fall-2021/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-nutcracker-at-the-philadelphia-academy-of-music-and-more-dance-for-fall-2021/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 08:51:43 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-nutcracker-at-the-philadelphia-academy-of-music-and-more-dance-for-fall-2021/ This fall is the long-awaited rendezvous for dancers and the public. BalletX kicked off the season with a recreation of the troupe’s 2014 production Sunset, o639 hours, which ended last week. They will be on tour for the rest of the year but are planning local pop-ups, so check it out balletx.org for updates. Two […]]]>

This fall is the long-awaited rendezvous for dancers and the public.

BalletX kicked off the season with a recreation of the troupe’s 2014 production Sunset, o639 hours, which ended last week. They will be on tour for the rest of the year but are planning local pop-ups, so check it out balletx.org for updates.

Two of the city’s longtime favorite businesses have missed birthdays due to the pandemic and will finally see their milestone seasons later this fall. Koresh Dance Company will celebrate its 30th anniversary with the premiere of TikVAH, and Philadanco will look beyond its 50 years of history by highlighting a new generation of choreographers in Fast forward.

The Annenberg Center, now Penn Live Arts, will also begin celebrating its 50th anniversary. The first dance performance of the season will be presented by innovative New York tap dance company Dorrance Dance.

For those not ready for big theaters, several local companies organize more intimate outdoor events and in smaller venues, including Kun-Yang Lin / Dancers at Rail Park and their South Philly studio, and Pasión y Arte in their West Philly studio and Downtown Asian Arts Initiative.

The season ends with the return of the Philadelphia Ballet, formerly Pennsylvania Ballet, bringing back The Nutcracker by George Balanchine.

Here are the dance shows to look forward to all season long. Check the websites for current COVID-19 protocols.

In Being / With: Living, two spectators in two different locations are guided by a live stream to converse and dance with each other. Tickets are required to participate, but galleries outside each performance space feature interviews with nearby residents and works by local artists that can be viewed for free. (Until October 2, $ 35, Pearlstein Gallery at Drexel University and Trinity Church in South Philly, 3401 Filbert Street Where 2300 S. 18th St., 215-413-1318, fringearts.com) 🎟 To buy tickets

This multidisciplinary, story-driven performing arts ensemble features a semi-autobiographical solo work by aerial artist Mae West. The comprehensive show, suitable for ages 18 and over, highlights under-represented voices in the sex industry. (Until September 25, $ 10 to $ 50, MAAS Building Studio, 1325 N. Randolph St., 215-413-1318, fringearts.com) 🎟 To buy tickets

The all-female flamenco ensemble of Philly opens its creative jam sessions to the public, welcoming artists from all walks of life to share their creative energy. The event also includes performances by artistic director Elba Hevia y Vaca and artist in residence Amanda Pena. This is the first session in a four-part series that runs until next spring. (Sep 24, free, Overbrook Garage Studio, 6411 Overbrook Avenue, pasionyarteflamenco.org)

Contemporary Asian American company Kun-Yang Lin / Dancers presents an in situ work with simultaneous performances along the completed part of the park. (Sep 24, free, Rail Park, 1300 Noble Street, pre-registration required at therailpark.org) 🎟 Register now

Two works that appeared earlier this year in New York are coming here as part of the Philly Fringe. STELLAR, commissioned by the Baryshnikov Arts Center, is an Afro-futuristic fictional film mixing jazz, improvised dance and the cosmos. To augment is a live show centered on the joys of dance and drawing inspiration from various contexts, from churches to clubs. (Sep 24-25, $ 35, FringeArts, 140 N. boul. Christopher Colombus., 215-413-1318, fringearts.com) 🎟 To buy tickets

Wanting to perform as a mature dancer after eight years of retirement, Philly choreographer Kun-Yang Lin collaborated with Swarthmore College dance director Pallabi Chakravorty and acclaimed postmodern dancer Gus Solomons Jr. to design methods allowing to recover dance skills which tend to decline with age. In this event, the three will discuss and present the practices they have developed during their 10 month project. (Sep 25, free, CHI Movement Arts Center, 1316 S. Ninth Street, reservation required by email katie@kyld.org)

Almanac welcomes audiences of all ages to the Keeper’s Zoological Institute for a fun and interactive show. Aimed at school-aged children, the participatory show features a cast of acrobatic monsters who have been captured and need help breaking free. (Sep 25-26, $ 10, MAAS Building Garden, 1320 N. 5th Street., 856-441-2837, cannonballfestival.org) 🎟 To buy tickets

After pandemic delays, Koresh’s 30th anniversary season finally arrives with new work from art director Ronen Koresh, TikVAH, which means “openness to hope” in Hebrew. The first will be accompanied by previous works that highlight the company’s heritage. (Oct 21-24, $ 45, Suzanne Roberts Theater, 480 S. Broad St., 215-985-0420, koreshdance.org) 🎟 To buy tickets

This Philly-based dance company mixes the East Asian notion of universal energy flow, or chi, with contemporary movement to create transcendent pieces. Their Fall Studio Series features choreography by art director Kun-Yang Lin, as well as original work by dance artist Evalina “Wally” Carbonell. (November 4-5, CHI Movement Arts Center, 1316 S. Ninth Street, kyld.org)

Tablaos are evenings of improvised flamenco shows in an intimate setting similar to a jazz club or a poetry reading. The all-female flamenco ensemble Pasión y Arte first hosted the event in Philly in 2015 and continues the tradition this year. (November 19-21, Asian Arts Initiative, 1219, rue de la vigne, pasionyarteflamenco.org)

The award-winning New York City valve company is known for advancing the art form while remaining steeped in tradition. Founded by acclaimed tap dancer and MacArthur member Michelle Dorrance, the company brings together dancers and musicians in exhilarating performances of improvisation and choreography. (December 9-11, Penn Live Arts at Annenberg Center, 215-898-3900, pennlivearts.org) 🎟 To buy tickets

Joan Myers Brown’s world-famous company celebrates its 50th anniversary with Fast forward, highlighting new works by emerging international choreographers Bakari Lindsay, Thang Dao, Ray Mercer and Kathy Smith. (December 10-12, $ 29- $ 49, Kimmel Center, 300 S. Broad St., 215-893-1999, kimmelculturalcampus.org) 🎟 To buy tickets

The Philadelphia Ballet, formerly Pennsylvania Ballet, returns to the stage with its centuries-old tradition: The Nutcracker by George Balanchine. The production marks the start of the company’s long-awaited 2021-2022 season, marking its first theatrical performance in over a year. (December 10-31, from $ 25, Academy of Music, 240 S. Broad St., 215-893-1999, philadelphiaballet.org) 🎟 To buy tickets

“LEARN MORE: To learn more, check out our complete guide to the fall arts.


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True Colors: Inside the Director Scramble at MOCA Los Angeles https://schlammpeitziger.com/true-colors-inside-the-director-scramble-at-moca-los-angeles/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/true-colors-inside-the-director-scramble-at-moca-los-angeles/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:07:13 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/true-colors-inside-the-director-scramble-at-moca-los-angeles/ For a few days there was a rare apparition of calm at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. After months of searching for an executive director to share tasks with the art director Klaus Biesenbach, the museum announced earlier this month that he had poached Johanna burton of the Wexner Center for the […]]]>

For a few days there was a rare apparition of calm at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. After months of searching for an executive director to share tasks with the art director Klaus Biesenbach, the museum announced earlier this month that he had poached Johanna burton of the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. The two would share responsibilities in a carefully calibrated leadership structure. After months of turmoil, with staff resignations, a drop in income, the layoffs of 97 part-time employees and the over 30 full-time employees, MOCA finally seemed to have a roadmap for the future.

“I don’t think it’s a single job” Maria Seferian, the former lawyer who is now chairman of the board of directors of MOCA, Recount The New York Times to the appointment of Burton. “I think he’s the right role model for us right now. Maybe it wouldn’t have worked 20 years ago and it won’t work 20 years from now, but now is the right time for us.

“Personally, I couldn’t have asked for a more talented and inspiring person to lead MOCA! ” Biesenbach wrote on Instagram.

But despite the sincere legend, Biesenbach will not lead MOCA with anybody. Last Friday, just seven days after the museum released Burton’s appointment, Biesenbach revealed he will be leaving– flying nearly 10,000 kilometers to Berlin to become director of the Neue Nationalgalerie, as well as of its future 20th century museum. He informed the board just days after the duo format was hailed as the only way to move MOCA forward. (MOCA confirmed that Biesenbach informed the board and staff of his departure on September 10, the same day as a report on the meeting in the Journal d’Art was released at 3:09 p.m. London time, or 7:09 a.m. Los Angeles.) In a way, everything was business as usual at MOCA, one of the country’s most respected contemporary art institutions and a home of bad press for years.

“The MOCA board is united in supporting Johanna,” Seferian said in a statement for the story. “He’s a smart star. His leadership and curatorial skills will propel MOCA forward in an impactful and inclusive way. “

“I don’t think it’s a surprise to anyone that MOCA is a directors’ chop shop,” said Alex Logsdail, the director of the Lisson Gallery, which represents Garret Bradley, the artist and filmmaker who is still expected to have his retrospective at Geffen’s contemporary outpost at MOCA in September 2022. “No one lasts there more than a few years, so something’s wrong with the museum. It’s not that these people are all bad at their jobs. The common denominator is MOCA.

According to sources, that common denominator is specifically the MOCA board, which has long demanded more control over the museum than in many institutions – former curators have left amid feuds with the board, and one of them complained publicly that he was forced to make the programming reflect what is on the walls of the MOCA bosses’ houses. (MOCA said this characterization of the board was inaccurate.) It also doesn’t help that a few donors have opened their own LA museums. The Broad, founded by Eli Broad, the life administrator of MOCA had a presence of 917,489 in 2019, largely eclipsing the final MOCA tally that year of 357,747.

Biesenbach’s tenure as artistic director has been beset with criticism since his debut in 2018, when it was announced that a white European man would replace another white European man, Philippe Vergne. But to get a feel for the long history of controversy at MOCA, it is instructive to review the shock appointment of Jeffrey Deitch as museum director in 2010. Deitch’s brash MOCA remake performed to the crowd—Julien schnabel hosts a Dennis Hopper review! Let’s do a whole show on the disco with LCD Soundsystem! Following James franco the art of performance! – and caused a collective panic among the intelligentsia Angeleno. Artists Ed Ruscha, Catherine Opie, and Barbara kruger all have resigned from the board of directors. Exhausted Deitch raised the white flag in 2013. MOCA said Ruscha, Kruger and Opie returned in 2013 to help find Deitch’s replacement. Kruger is currently one of the museum’s four artist trustees.

This replacement was Vergne, the serious director of the Dia Art Foundation. But controversy also followed, this time in the guise of its chief curator. Helene Molesworth, who resented the way the council’s collecting habits seemed to dictate who got exhibits in his museum. In 2017, while onstage in San Francisco for an Artadia-sponsored interview series, Molesworth was asked about the challenges she faced in her job. She would have taken an ironic voice and said, “I am never under pressure to support the work of extremely wealthy white male artists who are brought together by the wealthy white men who run the museum. I would love to have this fight, because then I could really test myself against how it might feel. Vergne fired her in March 2018, citing “creative differences”, initiating more headlines and repel member of the Opie board of directors at the time. The museum and Vergne decided not to renew his contract.

Enter Biesenbach. From a 2019 perspective, Klaus and MOCA seemed to be a perfect match. Long a celebrity dog, his apartment parties beyond the Grand Street minimalist would draw Courtney Love, Lady Gaga, Franco, and many others. He was also an Instagram enthusiast who often broadcast his exploits live to his nearly 300,000 subscribers. When visitors met him at Frieze Los Angeles in February 2020, he looked tanned and rested. As he worked the aisles as a Hollywood energy broker, it was as if the City of Angels had razed a decade of his life to him.



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Sarasota Opera and other local arts organizations join forces to institute new COVID-19 safety protocols for indoor performances https://schlammpeitziger.com/sarasota-opera-and-other-local-arts-organizations-join-forces-to-institute-new-covid-19-safety-protocols-for-indoor-performances/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/sarasota-opera-and-other-local-arts-organizations-join-forces-to-institute-new-covid-19-safety-protocols-for-indoor-performances/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 09:01:48 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/sarasota-opera-and-other-local-arts-organizations-join-forces-to-institute-new-covid-19-safety-protocols-for-indoor-performances/ Sarasota’s arts organizations have announced new homeland security measures ahead of the 2021-22 season. According to a press release, “a growing number of patrons and artists are extremely uncomfortable participating without strong health and safety protocols in place… in response to this situation and the current strong community spread of the COVID-19 virus, leaders shared […]]]>

Sarasota’s arts organizations have announced new homeland security measures ahead of the 2021-22 season.

According to a press release, “a growing number of patrons and artists are extremely uncomfortable participating without strong health and safety protocols in place… in response to this situation and the current strong community spread of the COVID-19 virus, leaders shared their experiences and research of their March 2021 initiative #SafeArtsSarasota, which allowed local arts organizations to safely reopen to the public after being shut down during the pandemic. “

The ensembles, which include Asolo Repertory Theater, Circus Arts Conservatory, Florida Studio Theater, The Hermitage Artist Retreat, Sarasota Ballet, Sarasota Opera, Sarasota Orchestra, Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall and Westcoast Black Theater Troupe, have agreed that all patrons have 12 years and over must present a negative COVID-19 PCR test no earlier than 72 hours before a performance or a negative rapid COVID-19 antigen test no earlier than 24 hours before the display case. Customers will also have the option to present a valid COVID vaccination record as an alternative to negative test results.

Finally, all participants, regardless of their testing or vaccination status, must wear nose and mouth masks at all times inside the site.

“Performing arts organizations have faced unprecedented challenges in this pandemic. Our sector has been unable to function normally since March 2020. Since the arts community is a major economic driver for Suncoast, our organizations are working collaboratively to ensure that our patrons can safely continue to experience the joy of performing. direct, and we can keep our artists and staff employed. Our economic and creative vitality depends on providing the safest possible environment for everyone, ”noted leaders of arts organizations in a press release.



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The Quietus | Reviews | Genevieve Murphy https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-quietus-reviews-genevieve-murphy/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-quietus-reviews-genevieve-murphy/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 08:39:34 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-quietus-reviews-genevieve-murphy/ At I don’t wanna be an individual on my own, songwriter and performance artist Genevieve Murphy travels inside to tell the story of a drama-filled birthday party. The album is a one-woman show: Murphy plays every character in the story, going from a stressed mother to a shy daughter to a tired grandpa to a […]]]>

At I don’t wanna be an individual on my own, songwriter and performance artist Genevieve Murphy travels inside to tell the story of a drama-filled birthday party. The album is a one-woman show: Murphy plays every character in the story, going from a stressed mother to a shy daughter to a tired grandpa to a dazed grandmother, and sprinkling pop tunes in between. pieces of theatrical spoken word. In each of her monologues, she gives insight into each character’s psyche. And rather than telling the story through the words each character says directly, she writes down the words that cross each character’s mind, ultimately showing how memory is defined by how events are interpreted in the mind. .

Murphy embodies each of his characters so completely that the music quickly begins to feel eerily close for comfort. Listening to the words quickens as the mother frantically scrolls through her birthday to-do list and random chaotic screams pop up under her voice creates secondary anxiety, just like listening to the child’s shy voice as she moves away into her dark inner world. There aren’t many breaks for reflection – instead, Murphy remains trapped in a spiraling tornado, depicting the swarm of thoughts circling through every person’s head at all times. This constant whirlwind is heightened by the appropriate musical accompaniments that lurk beneath each speech-oriented track – noodle saxophones, quivering electronics, comedic screams. The few songs that explode in a synth pop wash, like “Before A Decade,” provide much needed musical relief of all intensity.

Murphy’s mother character is hard to love while listening I don’t wanna be an individual on my own. She’s a sharp lady who drives her daughter outside to a sunny garden party, openly competing with other mothers for the best party. The pieces that center his voice are frantic and his story quickly becomes unbearable. However, there is a charming awkwardness that is found in all songs that feature adult characters. Songs like “Roll The Drunk”, in which the child rolls his drunken grandmother through the bush, provide a much needed silliness that makes the album’s moments of despair all the more devastating.

The deep, haunting meaning of the album is finally revealed when Murphy casts that brilliant, awkward shine for enveloped instrumentals. The tracks “Bushes Of The Unknown” and “Sitting in the Shadow of the Bushes” both seem cold and sterile, like what it might be like to visit the most hidden parts of the human brain. Listening to them is like revisiting memories that we thought were over, highlighting the glittering cobwebs that hide among these faint memories. Somehow, however, they are always present, continuing to color life as we move through it.


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Italian sketches: Sylvano Bussotti | The Florentine https://schlammpeitziger.com/italian-sketches-sylvano-bussotti-the-florentine/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/italian-sketches-sylvano-bussotti-the-florentine/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 08:04:03 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/italian-sketches-sylvano-bussotti-the-florentine/ CULTURE Sylvano Bussotti Deirdre Pirro September 14, 2021 – 9:57 AM to share During five days between September 20 and 25, as part of Estate Fiorentina, several major Florentine cultural organizations will celebrate the Sylvano Bussotti’s 90th birthday, one of the city’s most versatile native sons, a composer and performer, artist, writer, actor, director, decorator […]]]>

Sylvano Bussotti

Deirdre Pirro

September 14, 2021 – 9:57 AM

During five days between September 20 and 25, as part of Estate Fiorentina, several major Florentine cultural organizations will celebrate the Sylvano Bussotti’s 90th birthday, one of the city’s most versatile native sons, a composer and performer, artist, writer, actor, director, decorator and costume designer.

Born in Florence on October 1, 1931, Bussotti began studying music at a very young age, starting with the violin. Later, at the Luigi Cherubini Conservatory, he studied piano, harmony and counterpoint, but he did not graduate because World War II interrupted his studies. The the relationship with his uncle, Tono Zancanaro, and his brother, Renzo, both painters, will be decisive in the evolution of the artist he will become, as will his subsequent meeting with the poet Aldo Braibanti.

“Although I left Florence a long time ago, I still have a deep relationship with this city which is bigger than me.

He continued his composition studies as an autodidact between 1949 and 1956. Bussotti partly attributes his love of music to the fact that his father was a bailiff at the Comunale Theater in Florence. As a child, he was able to see almost all the performances. From 1956 to 1958, he moved to Paris, where he took private lessons and met avant-garde members of the resident intelligentsia, such as composer and conductor Max Deutsch. In 1958, Florentine music began to be played in public, which resulted in concerts in Paris. This, in turn, led to major music publishing houses to publish his music.

In 1964-65, the Rockefeller Foundation invited the composer to Buffalo and New York, after winning three Società Italiana Musica Contemporanea awards in 1961, 1963 and 1965. A long list of other important awards followed in the years to come. In 1979, the Ford Foundation welcomed Bussotti to Berlin for a year. From 1965 a fundamental aspect of his work became the creation of musical theater performances, culminating in 1984, when he created BUSSOTTIOPERABALLET (BOB), in Genazzano, Lazio, where he still lives, which highlights stage concerts, theatrical performances, art shows and international festivals. Over the years, Bussotti’s career has encompassed artistic direction of the Teatro La Fenice in Venice and the Puccini Festival in Torre del Lago. He has taught the history of musical theater and composition in prestigious academies, including the Scuola di Musica de Fiesole, in addition to direction of the music section of the Venice Biennale from 1987 to 1991. His music is performed all over the world and is often featured on the program of prestigious institutions, such as La Scala in Milan, the Venice Biennale, the Teatro Regio in Turin, the Arena in Verona and the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino . As a visual artist, his works have also been exhibited in many places internationally.

Illustration of Sylvano Bussotti by Leo Cardini

The Florentine anniversary festivities in honor of Bussotti will focus on three aspects of his activities: film and sound production, choreography and the historical and artistic context in which he was active as a composer. The festivities will begin on September 20, as part of the Fabbrica Europa arts festival, with Sylvano Bussotti: the context, the scenes, a conversation during which Luca Scarlini will discuss with some of the protagonists of the cultural scene of which Bussotti was part. This highlight of his role as a national, international and multidisciplinary artist will be enriched by the archive photographic images of some of his productions. As a director, his idea of ​​theater is to integrate music, dance, song, recitation and painting. This event will take place live at the PARC Performing Arts Research Center as well as on the social networks of the project partners.

On September 22, the Stensen Cultural Foundation will host an evening of screenings and performances as part of the Tempo Reale Festival since cinema occupies a preponderant place in all of Bussotti’s works of art throughout his career. With absolute avant-garde experience, Rara Movie (1965-69), the feature film Apologies is a significant example. Produced in Berlin in 1972, the music is by Sylvano Bussotti and of a real rarity. The program opens with the 5 Videogiornali della sestina musica 91, funny video clips made in 1991 for the Venice Biennale, in which Bussotti interacts with iconic celebrities of Italian pop culture of the time, including Maurizio Costanzo, Patty Pravo, Moira Orfei and Moana Pozzi.

On September 23, the feature film Bussotti by himself (1975), produced by Carlo Piccardi for Swiss Italian Television, in close collaboration with Bussotti, will be screened as part of the Florence Queer Festival at the La Compagnia cinema.

A double event will close the festivities on September 25. At the end of the afternoon, the book by Renzo Cresti Sylvano Bussotti and the brilliant opera (Maschietto Editore) will be presented at the Florence Opera. It tells the story of the artist’s Florentine childhood, his meeting with cultural figures, such as John Cage, Carmelo Bene, Umberto Eco and Pier Paolo Pasolini, and includes an unpublished work by Bussotti as well as a selection of his scores, which are works of art in themselves. .

Finally, in the evening, Ermafrodito, a concert-choreography will be staged at the Marino Marini Museum, narrated by Luca Scarlini with music by Sylvano Bussotti (Ermafrodito Gran Fantasia mitologica per chitarra, 1997). One of today’s greatest guitarists, Alberto Mesirca, will perform, while Luisa Cortesi dances. This event is free, but reservations are required.

In an interview, when Susanna Persichilli asked Bussotti about his special relationship with Florence, he replied: “Although I left Florence a long time ago, I continue to have a deep relationship with this city which is greater than me. Just like the city with him. Happy birthday, maestro!



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Vermont performance venues use federal funding https://schlammpeitziger.com/vermont-performance-venues-use-federal-funding/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/vermont-performance-venues-use-federal-funding/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 03:37:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/vermont-performance-venues-use-federal-funding/ SHELBURNE, Vt. (WCAX) – One of Vermont’s favorite artists took the stage on Friday night as part of Ben and Jerry’s Concerts on the Green at the Shelburne Museum. Hailing from Rockstar and Waitsfield, Grace Potter was introduced to an almost full crowd by Rep. Peter Welch. Welch sponsored a bill called Save Our Stages, […]]]>

SHELBURNE, Vt. (WCAX) – One of Vermont’s favorite artists took the stage on Friday night as part of Ben and Jerry’s Concerts on the Green at the Shelburne Museum. Hailing from Rockstar and Waitsfield, Grace Potter was introduced to an almost full crowd by Rep. Peter Welch.

Welch sponsored a bill called Save Our Stages, also known as SOS. The bill funds billions of dollars for performance venues across the country. Higher Ground, partner of the museum’s concert series, was one of these recipients.

Welch said he was there to emphasize the importance of the arts and what better way than to showcase those of Vermont.

Museum director Tom Denenberg was delighted that the series returned after COVID-19 put the music on hiatus. “The Shelburne Museum has partnered with Higher Ground to host concerts at the museum for 20 years now. Of those 20 years we had to jump last year, came back strong in 2021, but this Shuttered Venue grant was really essential to making sure we could get music here in Vermont.

The Shuttered Venue Operators grant is part of the SOS Act, which was sponsored by Vermont Representative Peter Welch.

“The theory here was that our performance spaces were really crucial. They were the first to close and the last to reopen, ”Welch said.

According to Welch, of the $ 16 billion invested in the program, more than $ 20 million went to Vermont theaters.

“The arts are especially important as we try to get out of COVID. There is nothing better than live music to cheer us up.

Denenberg said federal help received during the pandemic was crucial in keeping so many museums and places open. “One of the things that we take very seriously at the museum is music and arts education,” he explained. “We know this is so important to the health of the community and the way children learn, so we are delighted to have music here.”

Grace Potter will be back at the Shelburne Museum on September 11. However, this show is sold out. The next upcoming artist is Dr. Dog on September 21st.

Copyright 2021 WCAX. All rights reserved.


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Joey Tartell visits UCA as Artist in Residence | New https://schlammpeitziger.com/joey-tartell-visits-uca-as-artist-in-residence-new/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/joey-tartell-visits-uca-as-artist-in-residence-new/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/joey-tartell-visits-uca-as-artist-in-residence-new/ The University of Central Arkansas College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences will host Joey Tartell from Monday, September 20 to Thursday, September 23, 2021, as part of the Fall Artist-in-Residence Program. All events are free and open to the public. Tartell, a trumpet professor at Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, will team up […]]]>

The University of Central Arkansas College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences will host Joey Tartell from Monday, September 20 to Thursday, September 23, 2021, as part of the Fall Artist-in-Residence Program. All events are free and open to the public.

Tartell, a trumpet professor at Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, will team up with UCA Jazz Ensembles at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Reynolds Performance Hall.

Tartell will present the Trumpet Master Class on Monday from 2 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. in the Snow Fine Arts Recital Hall. He will discuss “Arts Communication” on Tuesday at 13:40-14h50

“His opinions, his ideas and his way of teaching are contagious,” said Ross Ahlhorn, assistant professor of trumpet at UCA. “I hope people take advantage of this opportunity.”

Tartell is principal trumpeter in major symphony orchestras, including Maynard Ferguson’s group, the Canadian Brass and the Boston Brass. He hosts the podcast “The Open Bell” and runs the blog “The Tartellog”, where he defends the arts.

He has recorded with the Woody Herman Orchestra and the US Army Jazz Ambassadors. Tartell’s other recordings include the Buselli / Wallarab Jazz Orchestra, the Birch Creek Music Performing Center, and the Doug Lawrence Orchestra. He has also performed with the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra and the Glenn Miller Orchestra.

As a freelance artist, Tartell has supported artists such as Doc Severinsen, Aretha Franklin, Don Henley, Manhattan Transfer, Barry Manilow, and Arturo Sandoval. He has recorded for the Bob and Tom Show, Orange Bowl Halftime and Parade, Chicago Tribune, Electronic Arts and Konami. He was a student of Gil Johnson, Barbara Butler, Mel Broiles and Vince DiMartino.

Tartell holds an MA in Jazz Studies from the University of Miami and a Bachelor of Music from the Eastman School of Music, where he also obtained a Performing Certificate.

For more information or to view some live events, visit CAHSS Artists in Residence or contact Ahlhorn by email at cahlhorn@uca.edu.


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Guild offers ‘Evening in Spain’ | News, Sports, Jobs https://schlammpeitziger.com/guild-offers-evening-in-spain-news-sports-jobs/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/guild-offers-evening-in-spain-news-sports-jobs/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 05:28:06 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/guild-offers-evening-in-spain-news-sports-jobs/ EVENT PLANNERS – The Ohio Valley Music Guild is hosting “An Evening in Spain” on September 19, starting at 4 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom at The Chateau Pier Bed and Breakfast and Event Center at 195 State Route 151, Smithfield . It will feature Alba Flamenca, a Pittsburgh music and dance ensemble and a […]]]>

EVENT PLANNERS – The Ohio Valley Music Guild is hosting “An Evening in Spain” on September 19, starting at 4 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom at The Chateau Pier Bed and Breakfast and Event Center at 195 State Route 151, Smithfield . It will feature Alba Flamenca, a Pittsburgh music and dance ensemble and a tapas buffet. There will be a full bar. Tickets cost $ 50 per person with September 14 as the deadline for reservations. Hovering over the plans for the guild’s first in-person event since November 2019, left to right, Board member Roxanne Matysiak; Matthew Gallabrese, treasurer; Joyce Orlando, program chair; and Judi Gaynor, former president. – Janice Kiaski

SMITHFIELD – The Ohio Valley Music Guild is eager to pick up where it left off with in-person events that offer a variety of cultural experiences to area residents.

This effort resumes with a local performance that will transport spectators abroad through “An evening in Spain”, featuring Alba Flamenca, a music and dance ensemble from Pittsburgh.

The show will take place on September 19 starting at 4 p.m. at a venue for the first time for the guild – in the Grand Ballroom at Le Chateau Pier Bed and Breakfast and Events Center. It is located at 195 State Route 151, Smithfield, and is owned and operated by Todd and Tina Piergallini.

Tickets cost $ 50 per person and include a tapas buffet. There will be a full bar. The reservation deadline is September 14th. There will be valet parking.

Tickets can be ordered online at https://checkout.square.site/buy/YUO53KRC66Z3CHQPIVYTAW2G or by making a check to the Ohio Valley Music Guild with the number of attendees and sending it to the Ohio Valley Music Guild, PO Box 2158, Wintersville, OH 43953.

“We are getting back on track – yes, definitely” commented Joyce Orlando, Program Chair, Guild Mission To Bring “Quality cultural music for local audiences at an affordable price”.

The hour-long show will feature dancers and musicians.

Since its inception in 2010, Alba Flamenca has performed in venues in western Pennsylvania including the Kelly Strayhorn Theater, Three Rivers Arts Festival, Hazlett Theater, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Carnegie International Institute and many music festivals. universities, museums and private events. Formed by a core of professional musicians and dancers, its mission is to bring flamenco music and culture to the public in the region. Carolina Loyola-Garcia and Jon Banuelos are founding members, joined by Jeff Berman, Lynn Speakman, Guillermo Rodriguez, Maria Nunez and advanced students of Flamenco Pittsburgh.

The main ones of the group include:

≤ Carolina Loyola-Garcia is a professional stage artist and filmmaker. She was featured with Quantum Theater in the production of “The Red Shoes, Maria from Buenos Aires, Ainadamar, Mnemonic and Looking for Violeta; “ with Attack Theater in the production of “The Ruby Goldberg Variants; “ with Renaissance Winds and Mark Thompson’s Co .; with the Fidlesticks Family Concerts of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra; and has been conducting Alba Flamenca since 2010. She studied flamenco in Spain with Carmela Greco, Angel Atienza, La Tati, La Lupi, Rafael Campallo and among others. She is principal of the Flamenco Pittsburgh Dance School, founding member of the Uptown Quartet and professor of cinema at Robert Morris University. In 2013, she created her feature documentary “Sobre las Olas: A history of flamenco in the United States”

– Jon Banuelos is a flamenco guitarist, composer and songwriter living and performing in Pittsburgh. He began his musical studies in Tucson, Arizona, with Ismael Barajas where he played in the group Ismael Barajas Latin Jazz. He then studied at the American Institute of Guitar in New York, then three years in Jerez de La Frontera, Spain, where he studied and played flamenco guitar with master guitarists, dancers and singers. Banuelos has been performing in the Pittsburgh area for 11 years with ensembles such as Alba Flamenca and the world music ensemble Alma Mura, specializing in music from Latin America, Croatia and Portugal. He composes original music combining these experiences acquired over the years, including his EP “Creosote and beer” released on March 16, 2019.

– Jeff Berman is a multi-instrumentalist artist and composer, improviser whose work reflects his global musical vision. A native of New York and now living in Pittsburgh, he developed a concept of genre extension on mountain dulcimer, vibraphone and percussion that allowed him to collaborate across stylistic boundaries with a diverse group of artists. of the whole world.

He has performed internationally as a solo artist and as a member of various ensembles. Some of the artists he has performed, recorded and toured with include Andy Statman, Tony Trischka, Robert Een, Susan Mckeown, Lindsey Horner, Osei Koranke, Paul Bley, Linda Thompson and choreographers Yin Mei and Gia Cacalano. He has three recordings on the Palmetto Records label with his own compositions, and his music has been used for performance, dance, theater, and film, including the Oscar-nominated documentary. “In our water.” Berman has performed with Alba Flamenca and the Uptown Quartet since 2019.

– Maria Nunez was born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. She began her flamenco studies at a very young age at Difusion Cultural dela Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi and continued her studies at the Centro de Arte Luna Cabal under the direction of Lizette Barron. She played in the company of the Luna y Cantera Flamenco school.

She studied with Isabel Trivino, Mercedes Amaya, Karime Amaya and Marcela Morín. In July 2011, she participated in the third International Festival of Contemporary Dance Iberica, celebrated in Querétaro, Mexico, and continued her studies with Manolo Marin, Angeles Gabaldon, “El Junco”, Adrian Galia, Maria Pages, Mariano Bernal and Juan Paredes.

Nunez lives in Pittsburgh, playing with Alba Flamenca, where she took lessons with Fanny Ara and Alice Blumenfeld. She won second place at the 2016 Vivo Carlota Santana International Flamenco Competition in New York.

Orlando expressed enthusiasm for the upcoming performance at a different location and the start of a 2020 that was anything but normal, given COVID-19.

“We wanted to do an event at Le Chateau Pier, and we were planning one (there) but the pandemic struck”, Orlando noted, happy that the guild is advancing.

“It was just a decision that we knew we had to get back on schedule, and the board said to try,” Orlando said, describing Le Chateau Pier as “A beautiful room. “

Matthew Gallabrese, the guild treasurer who sits on the planning committee “An evening in Spain”, said the guild had not hosted an in-person event since their annual dinner in November 2019. This included a sit-down dinner at the Steubenville Country Club and a performance by young people who had competed and excelled in Valley’s Got Talent competition orchestrated by Bobbyjon Bauman’s of Sycamore Youth Center and Ohio Valley Youth Network.

It also included the award of the guild’s annual $ 1,000 scholarship, which was presented to Glory Dami.

A virtual performance in 2020 raised money for the guild and kept the name of the organization, according to Gallabrese, who explained that the performance was special given by singer Ashley Marina Yankello, a singer-songwriter from Pittsburgh, which had performed at the Valley, has talent. In 2020, the teenager appeared on NBC “America has talent.”

“We were trying to do something to keep our name out there and make sure people knew we were still there,” he said. It was also an opportunity to announce the recipient of the 2020 $ 1,000 scholarship, awarded to Mollie Vonderhaar from Xavier University.

Each year, the guild awards a scholarship of $ 1,000 to students in their second year and above who have a local connection and who have declared themselves to be music related.

He was also a loyal annual contributor of $ 1,000 to the Grand Theater Restoration Project.

Both are the pride of Orlando.

“Even though we didn’t meet and collect money, we still donated $ 1,000 to the Grand Théâtre, and we still donated our scholarship because that’s really the goal. other than organizing cultural events is supporting the artistic program and presenting a scholarship. “

Board member Roxanne Matysiak attended her first guild at the invitation of a friend and was impressed with a string quartet performance. Soon after, she became a supporting member.

“I had no idea this group was bringing people in, but the guild brings in some very talented people from outside the region, and that shouldn’t be a secret. “ she said.

The guild’s Facebook page puts its story into perspective, noting: “In 2003, a group of musicians from Steubenville brought in a New York impresario with local connections to produce and direct ‘Madame Butterfly’, an opera by Puccini. The audience at Steubenville High School loved it. The following year (2004) they staged an equally wonderful opera, ‘LaBoheme’ also by Puccini with an extraordinary lead tenor from the opera of Colon in Brazil.

“Based on the initial efforts, a committee was then formed in November 2004, a president was elected and commitments were made to develop an opera guild. Their goals were to bring opera and good music to the Upper Ohio Valley region by raising money to support the arts through membership drives, grant applications, canvassing of donations and fundraising events.

“From a handful of music enthusiasts at our first meeting in November 2004, we have since grown to over 100 members and new members are being added regularly. “

The association later changed its name to clarify that its programs were not limited to opera.

The guild has brought over 50 performances to the Ohio Valley over the years, some of them being Act II of The Nutcracker Ballet by performers of the Pittsburgh Ballet; a swing orchestra show with dance teachers; opera, Broadway and jazz singers and ensembles; and a steel drum orchestra.

“We are always looking for new members. Anyone can be a member”, said Gallabrese. Annual membership fees start at $ 20 with other levels of donor membership available.

For the first time, membership or sponsorship can be obtained online by visiting https://ovmusicguild.square.site/. Those interested can also visit the guild’s website (https://ohiovalleymusicguild.com/) or send a check to the Ohio Valley Music Guild, PO Box 2158, Wintersville, OH 43953.

For more information on the September performance, email info@ohiovalleymusicguild.com or call Joyce Orlando (740) 317-7162; Dottie Bossert, (740) 346-0518; Roxanne Matysiak, (740) 457-7011; or Judi Gaynor, (352) 281-6187.

Ross Gallabrese is the acting chairman of the guild and Toni Dondzila is the secretary.

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The best live music this fall that won’t cost you a fortune | Musical features https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-best-live-music-this-fall-that-wont-cost-you-a-fortune-musical-features/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-best-live-music-this-fall-that-wont-cost-you-a-fortune-musical-features/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 09:10:51 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-best-live-music-this-fall-that-wont-cost-you-a-fortune-musical-features/ Rochester has long been a stopover for national headliners and remains fertile ground for the production of local gemstones. After a fall without live music, we’re heading into a concert season with plenty of in-person shows. But these six stand out for their premium talent and reasonable ticket prices. From local musicians ready to get […]]]>

Rochester has long been a stopover for national headliners and remains fertile ground for the production of local gemstones. After a fall without live music, we’re heading into a concert season with plenty of in-person shows.

But these six stand out for their premium talent and reasonable ticket prices. From local musicians ready to get big to top indie and hip-hop artists, these concerts are the best guilt-free options for music lovers on a budget. In terms of value, these show tickets virtually pay for themselves.

Be sure to check out CITY’s calendar of events, both in print and online, for the latest listings. And don’t forget to visit the websites of the sites for the latest COVID guidelines.

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  • PHOTO BY FALL LAYNE
  • Aaron Lipp has performed with national artists Oliver Wood and Robert Randolph, but he lives in Naples.

September 5: Aaron Lipp playing Sunday Fun Day at Lincoln Hill Farms, 3792 NY-247, Canandaigua. To free; lincolnhillfarms.com.

Neapolitan multi-instrumentalist Aaron Lipp is not a household name. . . Again. But he’s one of the best musicians in the Finger Lakes. A prolific country-bluegrass artist, he performs frequently with singer-songwriter Oliver Wood of the Wood Brothers and has been a touring member of Robert Randolph & The Family Band.

Lipp’s technical chops and musical expressiveness are unmistakable, whether he plays with one of his many bands – such as The Slacktones or Temple Cabin Bluegrass Band – playing a catchy set with bassist Brian Williams, or solo, as he will do during this free afternoon. show in the bucolic Lincoln Hill Farms of Canandaigua.

He will also be playing the album release concert for his upcoming album “Nothing to Lose” on September 25 at the Steuben Brewing Company in Hammondsport, so now is a good time to see him. If you’re lucky enough to hear Lipp play live, drop what you’re doing and make it happen.

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As Amigo the Devil, singer-songwriter Danny Kiranos writes murderous haunted ballads with a fine line between love and death.  - PHOTO BY PAMELA PONDEROSA

  • PHOTO BY PAMELA PONDEROSA
  • As Amigo the Devil, singer-songwriter Danny Kiranos writes murderous haunted ballads with a fine line between love and death.

September 24: Amigo the Devil at Photo City Music Hall, 543 Atlantic Ave. # 2. 18 and over, $ 20; photocitymusichall.com.

Danny Kiranos – aka Amigo the devil –And his goth-Americana murder ballads are well known to Rochester audiences, but it’s always a delight when the macabre singer-songwriter comes to town. Its sound is like acoustic music for metalheads. Kiranos is a masterful storyteller whose skills shine through in his spooky love songs shadowed by death and the ominous possibility that tragedy may strike at any moment.

Amigo the Devil’s latest album, “Born Against”, finds the artist adding more instrumental colors to his sonic palette for a fuller and more epic production. But the deliciously dark songs remain. If you prefer your folk music full of seedy characters and horror-laden stories, look no further than Amigo the Devil.

September 25: Danielle Ponder at Hollerhorn Distilling, 8443 Spirit Run, Naples. 21 and over, $ 25 advance, $ 30 gate; hollerhorn.com.

Rochester Soul Song Wonder Danielle Ponder has had a hell of a run the past two years. After more than a decade of wowing local audiences, Ponder burst onto the national stage when she caught NPR’s attention as the star of its Tiny Desk 2020 contest. 2021 Newport Jazz Festival lineup followed.

While enjoying the well-deserved spotlight, the dynamic and powerful singer remains rooted in the local music scene and has performed shows throughout the region since his quarantine was lifted. Now is the perfect time to see Ponder perform, before his rising star makes his shows in the Rochester area much rarer. And the highly regarded Hollerhorn Distilling in Naples is an ideal environment to attend a high-level concert.

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Aqueous's Halloween-themed three-set show at Anthology in October is the stuff of jam band fans' dreams.  - PHOTO PROVIDED

  • PHOTO PROVIDED
  • Aqueous’s Halloween-themed three-set show at Anthology in October is the stuff of jam band fans’ dreams.

October 30: Aqueous at Anthology, 336 East Ave. 21 and over, $ 22; anthologielive.com.

Jam band fans, rejoice! On the eve of Halloween, Aqueous – the popular indie rock band with improvised tendencies – plays not one, not two, but three sets at Anthology. This band knows how to groove and can get through psychedelic rock, funk, reggae, alternative and progressive rock from the 60s effortlessly.

The quartet’s catchy and catchy songs are the perfect soundtrack for a wonderful sound experience. With over three hours of music, almost a certainty, to say that you get what you pay for is an understatement.

November 12: From Montreal with Locate S, 1 at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $ 20; waterstreet2020.com.

Montreal’s show at the newly reopened Water Street Music Hall in November could be considered the most pleasant surprise of the fall music lineup in Rochester. Cult indie pop darlings, led by avant-pop mastermind Kevin Barnes, emerged from its cocoon like a strange psychedelic butterfly in the mid-2000s, winning the hearts and minds of fans and critics with the albums. technicolored and synth-laden such as “Satanic Panic in the Attic”, “The Sunlandic Twins” and “The Hissing Faun, Are You The Destroyer?” ”

Despite the multiple changes to its touring lineup over the years, the quirky surrealism and bizarre fun for which From Montreal is known are alive and well. Their new 20-track album, “I Feel Safe with You, Trash,” retains the group’s dizzying, kaleidoscopic soundscapes and idiosyncratic chord changes, but adds a straightforward, concise pop-song sensibility to the madness. Music aside, De Montreal is famous for its extravagant stage shows, which border on performance art shows. You will regret it if you miss this concert.

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Kevin Barnes is the mastermind behind Montreal's trippy and endlessly bizarre indie pop group.  - PHOTO BY CHRISTINA SCHNEIDER

  • PHOTO BY CHRISTINA SCHNEIDER
  • Kevin Barnes is the mastermind behind Montreal’s trippy and endlessly weird indie pop group.

November 19: Raekwon, Ghostface Killah, GZA at the Main Street Armory. 900 E. Main St. 18 and over, $ 40 advance, VIP $ 55; Mainstreetarmory.com.

Arguably the hottest gig of the fall season, this triple rap royalty project at the Main Street Armory is a sight not to be missed. Superstar entertainers Raekwon, Ghost Killah, and GZA – all original members of the legendary hip-hop group Wu-Tang Clan – share the bill, bringing tireless flow and balance to deeply striking boom-bap rhythms. You’d be hard pressed to find a bigger hip-hop group than Wu-Tang Clan, the influential Staten Island group that emerged in the early 90s. Since then, Wu-Tang has not relaxed its grip on the rap, or pop culture as a whole for that matter. The three Wu-Tang rappers have recent releases whose complementary live performances have been sidelined by the pandemic: the 2021 singles “Bring Dat Doe” and “Enemies” by Raekwon, the 2020 singles “The Mecca” and ” Feds ”by Ghostface Killah, and GZA’s 2020 EP“ Halloween Assassin ”. Even at $ 40 and $ 55, it’s a good deal to see a trio of original Wu-Tang Clan members take the stage together. Don’t sleep on this show.

Daniel J. Kushner is the artistic writer for CITY. He can be contacted at dkushner@rochester-citynews.com.

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Bluegrass icons get personal in next produced TV show, filmed in Owensboro https://schlammpeitziger.com/bluegrass-icons-get-personal-in-next-produced-tv-show-filmed-in-owensboro/ https://schlammpeitziger.com/bluegrass-icons-get-personal-in-next-produced-tv-show-filmed-in-owensboro/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 05:36:15 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/bluegrass-icons-get-personal-in-next-produced-tv-show-filmed-in-owensboro/ Del McCoury. Rhonda Vincent. Dan Tamynski. These are some of the world famous bluegrass stars who have come to Owensboro to delve deeper into their personal stories. Featuring never-before-seen information on artists’ careers, the upcoming My Bluegrass Story TV show was thought out, developed and filmed in Owensboro. The show is slated to air on […]]]>

Del McCoury. Rhonda Vincent. Dan Tamynski. These are some of the world famous bluegrass stars who have come to Owensboro to delve deeper into their personal stories. Featuring never-before-seen information on artists’ careers, the upcoming My Bluegrass Story TV show was thought out, developed and filmed in Owensboro.

The show is slated to air on RFD-TV later this year, with the first season featuring 13 artists ranging from longtime icons to emerging stars.

And it all happened through the collaborative effort of Owensboro-based organizations – the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame and Museum and the advertising and design agency Tanner + West.

The idea for the show was born out of a brainstorming session between Chris Joslin, director of the Hall of Fame, and Jason Tanner, owner of Tanner + West.

Filmed within the four walls of the Hall of Fame, each 30-minute episode highlights a particular artist as they tell their story of the personal impact Bluegrass music has had on them. Artists also interact with artifacts relating to bluegrass music and perform songs important to their careers.

Most of the artists featured in the first season of My Bluegrass Story performed at the Hall of Fame’s ROMP festival, so previous footage of their performances at the festival is featured on the TV show as well.

According to Tanner, the artists enjoyed getting to the heart of their story through the interview process for each episode. It was the director’s role to dig deeper into the artist’s background stories, childhood memories and influences, the meaning of certain songs and other ideas that most people had never heard of. previously.

But the real highlight of each episode is a live solo performance filmed inside the Hall of Fame Hall surrounded by the plaques of former Hall of Fame inductees.

“These are mind-blowing performances,” Tanner said. “We filmed them a few meters away, so it’s like a private concert. Just seeing the level of dedication, talent and passion of these artists is amazing and inspiring. “

Each artist featured also brought an artifact or keepsake that is particularly meaningful to them. These artifacts were then left at the museum to be staged together as an exhibit at the end of the first season.

“It’s not just a TV show that you watch, it’s something that viewers can engage with here (at the museum),” Joslin said. “So now we’re thinking about how best to display these artifacts in a new My Bluegrass Story exhibit – whether it’s instruments, awards, pictures, song lyrics, etc. – with a multimedia presentation that will present these artefacts and the stories behind them. to life for our visitors.

Joslin said the Hall of Fame tries to tell stories with its exhibits, programming, an oral history video archive and Bluegrass Unlimited magazine. He said My Bluegrass Story is just another tool they’ll use to highlight the journeys of bluegrass artists.

“As live music energizes everything we do, television is a great way to creatively link stories with live performances,” he said. “Also, I thought it was important to showcase a wide range of artists in the first season, because bluegrass music is so diverse today. My Bluegrass story reflects this diversity.

Some of the performers include Hall of Fame members Del McCoury and Doyle Lawson. Others included Dan Tyminski; Grammy Award winners Rhonda Vincent as well as Tammy Rogers of The Steeldrivers; and IBMA Award winners Darin and Brooke Aldridge, Russell Moore, Becky Buller and Joe Mullins. The episodes also include emerging artists Noah Wall from The Barefoot Movement, Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley and Tony Kamel.

My Bluegrass Story will be distributed on RFD-TV from the end of the year. The cable channel’s content includes agribusiness, horses, the rural way of life, as well as traditional country music and entertainment. RFD-TV is distributed to over 100 cable, satellite and numerous streaming services with a reach of over 52 million households.

“RFD-TV is thrilled to be working with the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum, and we think it’s very authentic that a bluegrass music show originates from Kentucky and the genre’s premier destination,” said said Jeremiah Davis, Programming Director of Rural Media Group, Inc. “The quality of the production is top notch and we are sure our audiences will be drawn to the show. We are excited to add My Bluegrass Story to our programming calendar.

Tanner + West – a seven-time Emmy Award-winning regional agency – has produced and edited every episode of My Bluegrass Story. The episodes were directed by Tanner, Dave Docimo of Wavelength Films, Grand Peele of Muse Storytelling and Dan Miller of Bluegrass Unlimited.

One of the TV show’s original funders is Mike Simpson, former chairman of the board of directors of the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum.

“A nationwide television show on bluegrass music produced in Owensboro further strengthens the Hall of Fame’s position as a world-class destination for music,” said Simpson. “I am impressed that the Hall of Fame can provide this type of content using local resources and production talent. Ultimately, projects like this translate into an economic impact for Owensboro and Daviess County. ”

Joslin expanded on this, saying the show is both excellent internally for their own storytelling exhibits, but also serves the external mission of becoming a bigger economic player and attracting tourists from all over the world.

“This show is part of our vision to make the Hall of Fame a premier destination for bluegrass music,” said Joslin. “We want to help Owensboro, Kentucky live up to its reputation as the bluegrass music capital of the world. “

The entire 13-episode first season has been filmed. My Bluegrass Story is initially scheduled to air in November and will also be available online at watchrfdtv.com.

“People are going to be blown away when they see it,” Tanner said. “Even if you are not a fan of bluegrass music, if you are a fan of a good story, you are going to love this show. And I can almost guarantee that there will be people who have never heard of these artists before who become fans after watching the episode. We have already seen this happen from a few people who have watched the pilot. This is a result we did not expect.



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