Performance Artist – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://schlammpeitziger.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Performance Artist – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ 32 32 ON THE VERGE”, an exhibition-investigation of the work of the interdisciplinary artist, deals with climate change and global migration https://schlammpeitziger.com/on-the-verge-an-exhibition-investigation-of-the-work-of-the-interdisciplinary-artist-deals-with-climate-change-and-global-migration/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:19:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/on-the-verge-an-exhibition-investigation-of-the-work-of-the-interdisciplinary-artist-deals-with-climate-change-and-global-migration/ The exhibition is presented at the LABAND ART GALLERY in Los Angeles through December 10and a site-specific DANCE PERFORMANCE takes place 1st December, 5-7 p.m. Works from 2017 to 2022 span photography, painting, sculpture, video installation and augmented reality LOS ANGELES, November 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The work of Los AngelesArgentinian photographer and interdisciplinary artist […]]]>

The exhibition is presented at the LABAND ART GALLERY in Los Angeles through December 10and a site-specific DANCE PERFORMANCE takes place 1st December, 5-7 p.m.

Works from 2017 to 2022 span photography, painting, sculpture, video installation and augmented reality

LOS ANGELES, November 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The work of Los AngelesArgentinian photographer and interdisciplinary artist Luciana Abait is the subject of “Luciana Abait: On the Verge”, a survey exhibition presented by Laband Gallery at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. This vast multimedia solo exhibition – up to December 10 – presents more than twenty works from 2017 to 2022, spanning photography, painting, sculpture, video installation and augmented reality. A dance performance has been added for 1st Decemberof 5-7 p.m.where the dancers will dance in dialogue with the pieces of Abait.

The exhibition presents a new photographic series “On the Verge”, created especially for the exhibition. These photos were taken at Lake Powell, a reservoir of water in the United States that is drying up at an alarming rate. Reminiscent of 18th century landscape paintings, the details in each photo reveal that you are not looking at a utopia. A dumpster, a paved parking lot, a water pump – these elements highlight how the human footprint interrupts the beauty of the natural world and serve as a reminder of the actions we can take to mitigate climate change.

Throughout the exhibition, Abait evokes imaginary worlds that deal with the fragility of our ecosystems and announce climatic catastrophes. It is clear that Abait is compelled by the presentation of existential incongruities in her otherworldly landscapes – in color, size and scale – to convey her ideas.

Of Buenos AiresAbait immigrated to United States in 1997. She taps into her personal feelings of displacement and vulnerability to inspire viewers to consider how global warming is wreaking havoc everywhere. Abait’s work “The Maps That Failed Us” – a monumental sculpture of world maps placed out of context – makes visible our social, physical and global interdependence. It invites us to consider our collective geographic proximity and our universal destiny to reorient our sense of shared planetary survival.

“Luciana Abait: On the Verge” was curated by Art Gallery Director Laband Karen Rappwhich says, “Luciana’s depictions of our contemporary climate crisis are equally overwhelming and inviting. His palette is sometimes biased in neon, deliberately unnatural, causing a disturbing effect. But, at the same time, she renders her images with surfaces and colors to remind us of what is at stake. Her landscapes figuratively push to the edge of planetary existence, as if urging us to step in and to do something good.

Another highlight is the site-specific digital projection “Agua” (2021), which has previously only been shown as part of a downtown Los Angeles public art project. The luminous waterfall of the work celebrates the beauty and sensuality of water, while recalling – in times of drought – the precariousness of its supply.

Abait said, “Through my photo-based landscapes, installations, videos and photo-sculptures, natural landscapes and man-made objects are incredibly suited to new roles where they co-exist in a magical reality. I frequently uses color manipulation to achieve a surreal and awe-inspiring mood in the landscape to create a childlike sense of wonder for viewers.Scientific evidence shows that nature is fundamental to our health.It has long been known that hope is crucial to people’s drive to care for the natural world People will feel it’s a lost cause if we only present the negative, but if we show them beauty and hope they will want to fight for planet Earth and take care of it.”

About the artist:

Born and raised in Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbait is based in Los Angeleswhere she is artist-in-residence at the 18th Street Arts Center in santa monica. His multimedia works address themes of environmentalism, climate change, ecological fragility, assimilation and immigration. Abait uses images of nature, including mountains, icebergs, and oceans, as well as flight plans, maps, and man-made structures, to serve as metaphors for his personal experience. Abait studied at the National School of Fine Arts “Prilidiano Pueyrredon” in Buenos Aires (1997), and has shown his work internationally and widely in Los Angeles.

SHOW IMAGES
Facility Pictures: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/g5r5uu6c371p2m5/AACDiybmvgx-GDSjejynbf10a?dl=0
Masterpieces: https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fo/0zwfjli3ivchlcu2vhdf6/h?dl=0&rlkey=8gsjh86mvnvqm8z6vxtc67gf2

https://www.lucianaabait.com/

Media contact:
Laura Grover
[email protected]
3109941690

SOURCE Luciana Abait, Photographer and interdisciplinary artist

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The Queer Horror of “Chucky”: Episode 2.07 – “Going to the Chapel” https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-queer-horror-of-chucky-episode-2-07-going-to-the-chapel/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 19:17:33 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-queer-horror-of-chucky-episode-2-07-going-to-the-chapel/ Each week, Joe Lipsett will highlight a key scene or interaction in S02 from Don Mancini’s Chucky series to examine how the series engages and contributes to queer horror. The time has come to finally tackle homosexuality in the Church. When it was revealed that chucky S02 would take place in a Catholic school and […]]]>

Each week, Joe Lipsett will highlight a key scene or interaction in S02 from Don Mancini’s Chucky series to examine how the series engages and contributes to queer horror.

The time has come to finally tackle homosexuality in the Church. When it was revealed that chucky S02 would take place in a Catholic school and Jake (Zackary Arthur), Devon (Bjorgvin Arnarson) and Lexi (Alyvia Alyn Lind) would likely face the wrath of priests and nuns, I anticipated that this subject would come up again at some point.

Before the start of the season, Don Mancini was interviewed on the new location and explained how Catholicism would play out in season two. By i09:

“One of the struggles that young gay people often have is tension with their faith,” Mancini said. “As a kid raised Catholic, I definitely had authority figures waving at me, telling me I was bad and going to hell.”

Considering how central Devon and Jake’s relationship was in the first season, it seemed obvious that their homosexuality would be a source of conflict in this new environment. And then there was the question of whether the show would dare to tackle the elephant in the room: accusations of pedophilia and sexual abuse within the church.

The show (wisely) never touched on this controversial territory, though there were more than a few tell-tale moments of secret queerness littered throughout the season. Specifically, Trace and I wondered about the sexual orientation of Devon Sawais Father Bryce in our chucky queers cover on horror queers. There is a very revealing moment in episode 2.03 “Hail Mary! when the priest observes Jake and Devon kissing in a stairwell and Father Bryce not only doesn’t interrupt, he doesn’t bother and punish them. At the time, Trace and I wondered if this meant he was struggling with and/or suppressing his own sexuality, which is not tolerated by the Church.

For reference, all Catholic priests take a vow of celibacy upon ordination, which means they will remain sober and celibate throughout their lives. Technically, however, homosexuals are not supposed to be ordained at all (the Church has clarified its position in both 2005 and 2008 when he lists “uncertain sexual identity” and “deeply rooted or deep-seated homosexual tendencies” as conditions for exclusion).

A 2019 New York Times editorial by Elizabeth Dias titled “It’s not a closet. It’s a cage.’ Gay Catholic priests speak outincludes an incredible statistic on the prevalence of gay men living a secret life of shame: “Less than about 10 priests in the United States have dared to come out publicly. But gay men probably make up at least 30-40 percent of America’s Catholic clergy, according to dozens of estimates by gay priests themselves and by scholars. Some priests say the number is closer to 75%. There are more moderate estimates included in the 2020 book by Reverend Donald B. Cozzens The new face of the priesthood (referenced in this America magazine coin), but the numbers could still be as high as 50-58%.

With these stats in mind, it’s entirely reasonable to believe that the “different” qualities Father Bryce mentions in the black-and-white confessional footage is that he’s gay.

Father Bryce never says the words “I’m gay,” but the truth is he doesn’t have to.* For queer audiences used to reading the subtext in the play, the following dialogue is as clear as day: always judging people so harshly. I think it’s because of the harshness with which I treat myself. The Church has always been a refuge for people like me. They never fully accepted us either. I always knew that I was different(emphasis added).

Some people might argue that his sexual orientation doesn’t really matter since Bryce has already been dramatically blown up in slow motion (and from multiple angles) by this point. Anyway, the representation of a young queer priest who observes but do not punish Jake and Devon for something he himself isn’t allowed to be is a fascinating and even tragic character arc.

Leave it to Mancini and co. to give Father Bryce a humanizing and heartbreaking semi-exit scene immediately after spectacularly blasting the poor man into the most over-the-top, explosive death of the season. RIP Father Bryce.

*But also, let’s be real: only a gay priest would have a ripped body like that, right?

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“BYOJ” Bring your own joy! Series of events by artist Nikki Williams in Harlem https://schlammpeitziger.com/byoj-bring-your-own-joy-series-of-events-by-artist-nikki-williams-in-harlem/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 05:15:36 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/byoj-bring-your-own-joy-series-of-events-by-artist-nikki-williams-in-harlem/ “I wouldn’t have seen it if I hadn’t believed it!” a “BYOJ” – Bring Your Own Joy! solo art performance by artist Nikki Williams in HarlemNY. Is presented by Spirit in Sunset Productions in association with Ryan Health Frederick Douglass. Solo art exhibition celebrating the joy of imagination, creativity and dream vision by Harlem Artist […]]]>

“I wouldn’t have seen it if I hadn’t believed it!” a “BYOJ” – Bring Your Own Joy! solo art performance by artist Nikki Williams in HarlemNY.

Is presented by Spirit in Sunset Productions in association with Ryan Health Frederick Douglass.

Solo art exhibition celebrating the joy of imagination, creativity and dream vision by Harlem Artist and writer Nikki Williams. The exhibit will be on view from October 4, 2022 to November 28, 2022, in the four windows of Ryan Health Frederick Douglass located at 2381 Frederick Douglass Blvd and 128 the Street in Harlem.

An artist talk will take place on Monday, October 24, 2022, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Artist Talk will be a “wonderful walk observing the daily creativity of Harlem and its citizens” starting at Ryan Health Frederick Douglass and ending at Ryan Health Adair located at 565 Manhattan Avenue at 124th Street in Harlem. Along with the artist, Nikki Williams, Mr. Charles Shorter, Executive Director of Ryan Health Adair, and Ryan Health Frederick Douglass will be on hand to help guide the walk and talk about Ryan Health, the arts and the Harlem community that Ryan

Health serves. Mr. Aboubakar Diaby, Special Projects Coordinator and Curator of the exhibition and Mr. Charles Ruiz, Administrative Coordinator, Assistant Curator will also be present to discuss the process of curating the exhibition.

Guests are Ms. Laurie Cumbo, Commissioner of the Department of Cultural Affairs, Ms. Nina Norwood, Deputy Director of Congressman Adriano Espaillat’s NY-13 Office, and Mr. Manny Belliard,

Deputy Director of Constituent Affairs, Office of Manhattan Borough President Mark Levine, Upper Manhattan Office. Ryan Health Frederick Douglas and Ryan Health Adair staff and healthcare providers when the Artist The presentation ends with the importance of creativity and imagination in relation to health and well-being.

For more information, contact Spirit in Sunset Productions at (212) 368-3571, spiritalkin@yahoo.com or Mr. Aboubakar Diaby, Special Events Coordinator at Ryan Health Frederick Douglass at (212) 222.5221 ext. 7826 or www.ryanhealth.org.

“I wouldn’t have seen it, if I hadn’t believed it!” is the work of creator and producer, Nikki Williams, Artistic Director of Spirit in Sunset Productions, and the creative force behind “B, YOJ” – Bring Your Own Joy! a campaign she spearheaded in 2021. The theme of the art exhibit centers around daring to see what you happily believe. This he also pays homage to the Magical Energy of Dreams and the Creativity of Children, in particular, Children of Color whose genius is not always reflected in the resources provided to them. “Children have a way,” Williams attests, “of reminding us of the importance of acknowledging and celebrating our innate blessing of joy — our seventh sense.”

Williams describes the footage in “I wouldn’t have seen it if I hadn’t believed it!” as a series of Art in Photo/Collage images that challenge you, as children are so adept at, “See what you believe”, rather than relying on believing what you see. Williams argues that “creativity is a celestial space within our inner being”. williams

interprets the biblical passage found in Matthew 18: “Truly I say unto you, unless ye change and become like little children, ye shall never enter the kingdom of heaven,” to mean that Artists go beyond what their five senses perceive.

Artists must first believe that a thing exists before they can see/create it and bring it to life. It takes faith, that of children, to know that everything is possible for those who believe. Children are fearless in their imagination – in how they imagine Nations. Williams taps into that same innate power of childlike wonder and imagination to create artwork that brings Visioned Dreams into the physical realm, challenging the viewer to look twice at artwork that, like the song “Pure Imagination,” written by Gene Wilder, tells the viewer, “What you find will defy explanation.


“I wouldn’t have seen it, if I hadn’t believed it!” also pays special tribute to those Artists working in the arts and education – the often unspoken heroes who shape how children see the possibilities and beauty of the world. Williams knows firsthand the value of Arts when it comes to educating children. She understands that most children respond and learn when lessons are presented through the prism of creativity. Williams has worked as an independent contractor for over twenty=five years with several arts organizations as an artist

Education specialist. Williams speaks of her colleagues when she says, “The work of professional artists who bring their gifts and expertise to classrooms, libraries, cultural centers, hospitals, community centers, etc., is often not not rewarded. Artists have a unique and enduring way of educating children and adults. Their impact, especially on children, is lasting. These artists open worlds to children through books, music, poetry, dance and especially the visual arts. Williams included a tribute to the artists who bring the Arts to children and adults in the inaugural exhibition at Blick Arts Material over the summer. Arts in Education Multidisciplinary artist Khuumba Ama and dancer, choreographer and poet Myna Majors were guest speakers at Artist Talk last August.

“I wouldn’t have seen it, if I hadn’t believed it!” launched what will be a traveling exhibition at Blick Art Materials located at 261 West 125 the Street, next to the famous Apollo Theater in Harlem. The exhibition is part of the “BYOJ”

TM – Bring Your Own Joy series of events that began as a creative writing workshop hosted by Williams’ third solo exhibition in spring 2022. The exhibition opened July 13, 2022 and was extended through September 7 2022, Williams is honored and delighted to have three solo exhibitions curated by Blick Art Materials at Harlem. His first exhibition celebrated the 50 year of the African American Day Parade in Harlem with selected photographs that Williams took of the parade over a period of twenty-five years. The second exhibition was part of the 12 Art Beats series by Blick Art Materials. A series where twelve artists have been selected to exhibit their works each month of the year. Williams’ artwork celebrated the achievements of women artists of color during the month of August. “Blick Arts The hardware,” says Williams, is “my creative home. I feel a sense of family every time I walk into the store. One is transformed by the power of creativity as soon as one opens the glass doors and the feeling of what can take hold of one’s Spirit. Williams admits that after decades of shopping at Pearl Paint, an art supply store officially located on Canal Street, which closed in 2014, she would never again feel a personal connection to the staff of an art store. ‘art.

Williams also feels extraordinarily blessed to have her works on display for the second time in Ryan Health Frederick Douglass’ windows. She is grateful that Executive Director Mr. Charles Shorter saw value in her idea of ​​celebrating the endless dreams and creativity inherent in communities of color. Last year, Ryan Health and the CEO of Ryan Health Harlem venues, Charles Shorter, spoke of viewing last year’s exhibit, “As a means of providing the community with an opportunity to celebrate, observe and witness an example of black excellence displayed through powerful imagery and poetry.” Williams prays that the exhibit and the poetry that accompanies the artwork will inspire those who live in the neighborhood, as well as the patients Ryan Health serves, and any children who view the exhibit to tap into the endless well. end of their own imagination. Williams is a multi-talented artist who has always added literature and theater to her visual art.

Nikki Williams, nicknamed “Renaissance Woman”, is an award-winning photographer and poet.

She is also an accomplished painter, playwright and performance artist who has been producing cultural arts programs for over thirty years. “BYOJ” – Bring Your Own Joy! was inspired by a poem Williams wrote last year when she produced a “Herstoric” photo shoot that focused on female artists of color aged 50 and older.

The poem of the same title can be found in her book “Mama Movers/Sistah Shakers” – A Celebration of World Dreaming Wimmin. On August 7, 2022, Williams designed and performed what she calls a “Joyathon.” For more than two hours, professional color artists presented a two-hour marathon non-stop presentation of the poetry and prose of Mr. Langston Hughes and Dr. Maya Angelou. The show took place inside the Robert F. Smith Performing Arts Center held inside Denny Farrell Riverbank State Park. The efforts and work of the participating artists, as well as Spirit in Sunset Productions, were recognized with proclamations presented by Ms. Nina Norwood, Deputy District Manager, Office of Congressman Adriano Espaillat NY-13. State Senator Cordell Cleare was also present that day and made a personal appearance presenting the artists with a proclamation. Ms. Minah Whyte, Community Liaison to Borough President Mark Levine, personally presented certificates of achievement earlier in the week.

“BYOJ” – Bring Your Own Joy! is now the title of a Coffee Table book published in June 2022. More “BYOJ” events will be featured this year. One of these will take place on Thursday, August 25, 2022. Williams will hold an artist talk outside Blick Art Materials at 4:00 p.m. Singer Lil Phillips, visual artist Sara Diallo and artist Rasheeda Shabazz will engage audiences with songs. and recounts their lives as artists and the creative process.

Williams Can’t Wait To Produce A “BYOJ” – Bring Your Own Joy! podcast by the end of the year. Audiences are encouraged to contact Spirit in Sunset Productions via their email address – byoj7@aol.com, to stay informed of upcoming “BYOJ” events.

Ryan Health Frederick Douglass and Blick Art Materials are accessible by public transit by taking the A, D, C, B and/or #2 and #3 trains to 125 the Street.

For more information, contact Spirit in Sunset Productions at (212) 368-3571, byoj7@aol.com or Ryan Health at (212) 222-5221 |ext.7826, www.ryanhealth.org

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Spotlight: Uzbekistan Pavilion goes beyond art to activate connection and learning at the Venice Biennale https://schlammpeitziger.com/spotlight-uzbekistan-pavilion-goes-beyond-art-to-activate-connection-and-learning-at-the-venice-biennale/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 19:26:01 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/spotlight-uzbekistan-pavilion-goes-beyond-art-to-activate-connection-and-learning-at-the-venice-biennale/ Every month hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Artnet gallery network – and every week we shine the spotlight on an artist or exhibition you should know about. See what we have in store and inquire for more with just a click. What do you want to know: […]]]>

Every month hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Artnet gallery network – and every week we shine the spotlight on an artist or exhibition you should know about. See what we have in store and inquire for more with just a click.

What do you want to know: The Foundation for the Development of Art and Culture (ACDF) of the Republic of Uzbekistan presents “Says Algorizmi—The garden of knowledgeat the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan at the Venice Biennale, which is open until November 27. The architecture and research studio Space Caviar (Joseph Grima, Camilo Oliveira, Sofia Pia Belenky, Francesco Lupia) organized and designed the exhibition with Sheida Ghomashchi, the Pavilion, transforming it into a site of collaboration, exchange and of learning – in fact, a veritable “garden of knowledge”.

The pavilion hosted extensive public programming and featured everything from the salon-style band Brutally Precocious Club, founded by Hans Ulrich Obrist, and various multidisciplinary workshops presented by Panoptic Garden. The inspiration behind “The Garden of Knowledge” was the work of scientist and polymath Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwārizmī, who largely undertook his research at the House of Wisdom in Baghdad, a gathering place for various intellectuals for meet and exchange ideas. The Garden of Knowledge is based on the idea that the House of Wisdom centered on a formal garden as is common in Islamic tradition, and would be where these scientists and scholars would meet.

Why we love it: While many entries to the Venice Biennale focus solely on showcasing artwork, Uzbekistan’s national pavilion instead focused on the opportunity to engage directly with a wide range of artists. , architects, academics, etc., creating a place to meet new people, hear new ideas and exchange knowledge. It is also still possible to discover the Garden of Knowledge later this month, on November 12, when the programming continues with a public meeting organized by Antonio Irre with opening performances and talks. And on November 19, editor Furqat Palvan-Zade of Border magazine will make a presentation on the next issues and will organize a Q&A with the collaborators and partners of the publication. Beyond what the pavilion has and will feature, a central aspect of the effort is the plan to reuse and recycle the physical materials that created the built environment, extending the life and influence of “Dixit Algorizmi – The garden of knowledge”.

According to the curator: “’Dixit Algorizmi—The Garden of Knowledge’ is an ongoing research platform for conversation and performance. Conceived and organized by Space Caviar with Sheida Ghomashchi, it was the national representation of the Republic of Uzbekistan at the Biennial Arte 2022: “The milk of dreams”. The scenography of the pavilion, designed to host gatherings and performances throughout the Biennale, draws on the history of Islamic gardens as places of intellectual production and exchange. In the context of “The Milk of Dreams”, the pavilion, defined as a garden of knowledge, functions as a place to reflect on the stories and layers of meaning embedded in contemporary technologies.
After the last performative event to be held in the pavilion, the Garden of Knowledge will be dismantled and all of its material components will be given to new uses, including the construction of future pavilions and artistic commissions. Materials will also be donated to emerging designers and artists to be reused in their artistic practice. —Joseph Grima

See the interior of the national pavilion of Uzbekistan below.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF. Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF.  Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF. Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF.  Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF. Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF.  Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF. Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF.  Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Installation view of the National Pavilion of Uzbekistan, Venice Biennale, 2022. Courtesy of ACDF. Photo: © Studio Gerda.

Says Algorizmi—The garden of knowledgeis open to the public at the Venice Biennale until November 27, 2022.

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Make an unforgettable day in November at Liberty Station https://schlammpeitziger.com/make-an-unforgettable-day-in-november-at-liberty-station/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 22:58:46 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/make-an-unforgettable-day-in-november-at-liberty-station/ Bring all your friends and family to ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station this month to make it a November to remember. Whether you choose to peruse veteran art in the former Naval Training Center, twist your mind at the premiere of Art in Bending Mysteries, discover your green thumb, discover new public art, or participate in […]]]>

Bring all your friends and family to ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station this month to make it a November to remember. Whether you choose to peruse veteran art in the former Naval Training Center, twist your mind at the premiere of Art in Bending Mysteries, discover your green thumb, discover new public art, or participate in a variety of First Friday experiences, ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station welcomes everyone to create unforgettable memories.

EVOLVING GESTURES MULTIMEDIA ART INSTALLATION BY LESLIE PIERCE | November 1 to 30

For the month of Novembergaze at the extraordinary multimedia art installation, ELEVATING GESTURESby artist Leslie Pierce located in Suite 104 of the Dick Laub NTC Command Center. The free one-month installation will include multimedia works such as video projections, drawings and paintings as well as drawings by the participants of the outdoor public event UPLIFTING GESTURES.

The exhibit was made possible through a collaborative grant from NTC Foundation and will last the whole month of November. The exhibition will be open Tuesday to Thursday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

FIRST FRIDAY at ARTS DISTRICT | November 4

Stroll around and see all there is to offer in the ARTS DISTRICT with various art exhibits, workshops and more for the first Friday of this month. You can see all the programming of events here with some highlights listed below.

mike oolong

Oolong Studio Milk

Oolong Studio Milk is hosting a two-hour “Moon Jar Workshop” from 4-6 p.m. Entrants will choose between a blue, white, or clear glaze and the finished piece will be ready for pickup in approximately 2 weeks. The workshop is $65, and to register, click here.

Mandell-Weiss Gallery

Mandell-Weiss Gallery presents its inaugural exhibition, Portraits from the Anthropocene Part I: Body, Energy, Space, Time. This exhibition represents the fundamental aesthetic of dance, while exploring the inextricable and conflicting relationship between the human body and the gravity of our imprint on the environment. This exhibition questions what it means to be a practicing artist in this time of global existential crisis.

Featured artists include Ellen Dieter, Shahla Dorfshan, Ajay Junious, Linda Litteral, Kathleen Kane Murrell, Kathy Nida, Katie Ruiz and Perry Vasquez. Participation is free and will be open from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

AUTUMN REPERTOIRE CONCERT | November 4-6

Dancers from the San Diego Dance Theater

San Diego Dance Theater presents “Up Close & Personal”, a collection of world premieres, a directory and an installation of photographic art. Director Terry Wilson and guest artist Bernard Brown created two world premiere dances as well as repertoire created by former artistic director Jean Isaacs and guest artists Lavina Rich, Khamla Somphanh and Odessa Uno.

Attendees will also enjoy a photographic installation by Doug McMinimy, one of San Diego’s top dance photographers, who converts Khamla Somphanh’s dance, Purposely Accidental, into a sequence of movements in space and time. into a series of still photographs.

The dance performance and photographic installation will take place at the Light Box Theater at ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station (2590 Truxtun Rd. Suite 205). Tickets are available for purchase online here.

FLEET WEEK MILITARY AND VETERANS ART EXHIBITION | November 4-13

There’s no better place to appreciate the artistic works of those who have served our country than at the former Naval Training Center in San Diego. Browse local art created by serving and retired military personnel at the Veterans Art Exhibit presented by Fleet Week San Diego in partnership with ARTS QUARTER Liberty Station. Attendees will have the opportunity to engage with all art mediums at the Martha Pace Swift Gallery from November 4-13. The exhibition will be open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

ART IN FLEXION PRESENTS “MYSTERY” TO THE LOT | November 10

Art in Flexion performance in public

Immerse yourself in the tantalizing cinematic journey, Mysterie, presented by bending art at the LOT in November. Looking through the eyes of circus professionals, Mysterie will reimagine the world from a warped point of view. This film will be the first of Art in Flexion’s big screen productions to hit theaters. The two-hour film will premiere at LOT on Thursday, November 10 at 6 p.m.

To buy tickets here.

MONTHLY GARDENING CLUB | November 11th

San Diego Craft Collective invites the community to join its gardening club on the second Friday of every month. Founder, Steffanie Dotson, saw an opportunity to turn an underutilized plot of land outside her studio into a living learning lab!

With support from a collaborative grant from the NTC Foundation, the new edible and pollinator garden serves to teach the community how gardening in a small space can be quite bountiful. Learn how to grow your own fresh organic fruits, herbs, and vegetables, plus all the benefits of healthy eating, being outdoors, and giving back some green space to our planet. Participation is $10 and free for members of the military.

To register, click here.

RADY CHILDREN’S ICE RINK | November 17

Rady Children's Hospital Ice Rink

The NTC Foundation welcomes Rady Children’s Hospital to celebrate the holiday season with the return of its outdoor skating rink from Thursday, November 17 through January 8, 2023. Located on the central promenade of ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station, Rady Children’s Ice Rink is in its 26th year and is a fun, family-friendly way to spend time together, raising money for the Thriving After Cancer program at the Peckham Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders.

The rink is a center of joy and inspiration throughout the holidays and will be open Monday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., excluding Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

BIRDS ON THE MOVE | November 20

mockingbird improvisation

Birds in Motion is a first two-day collaboration between San Diego Dance Theater and mockingbird improvisation. This innovative one-day improv event will consist of a two-hour improv workshop, led by the San Diego Dance Theater and the Mockingbird Improv Faculty. Actors and dancers are welcome to come and explore different interactions with improvisation!

During this workshop, teachers will guide students through improvisation games and structured scores. After the workshop, Mockingbird and the San Diego Dance Theater will close the evening with a collaborative performance featuring their professional companies! Students will be able to see elements of their studio on stage, and spectators will be able to experience two art forms brought to life!

The workshop and performance will take place at the Light Box Theater at ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station (2590 Truxtun Rd. Suite 205). Tickets are $25 for the workshop and $15 for the show and can be purchased
on line here.

LPA DESIGN STUDIOS | Opening this month

PLA Lobby

Welcome to the newest addition to the ARTS DISTRICT, LPA Design Studios, an integrated design firm focused on a design process that emphasizes performance, collaboration and inclusion. Their work earned them the AIA-California 2021 Firm Award, the state’s highest honor for an architectural firm. LPA shares an innovative vision and changes lives by design. LPA officially opened its doors on October 19 in its new studio space at Barracks 3.

About ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station

ARTS DISTRICT Liberty Station is San Diego’s largest arts and culture district, located in historic buildings of the former Naval Training Center in the Liberty Station neighborhood near downtown San Diego Bay. With 100 park-like acres, the ARTS DISTRICT is home to nearly 145 museums and galleries, artist studios, dance companies, fine restaurants, creative retail businesses and other organizations that showcase San Diego’s creative community and provide experiences innovations to the public. Visit here for more information.

See you there, San Diego!

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The week in classic: The Marriage of Figaro; Mahler Symphony No 8 review – phenomenal | Opera https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-week-in-classic-the-marriage-of-figaro-mahler-symphony-no-8-review-phenomenal-opera/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/the-week-in-classic-the-marriage-of-figaro-mahler-symphony-no-8-review-phenomenal-opera/ AAs an antidote to the return of the clocks and dark days, Mozart is always a good choice, especially in this case: the warmth of Seville, conveyed by the sparkling light of an Islamic-Christian palace, rich in gold and amber , makes Glyndebourne’s staging of Figaro’s wedding a fabulous visual feast (thanks to the creations […]]]>

AAs an antidote to the return of the clocks and dark days, Mozart is always a good choice, especially in this case: the warmth of Seville, conveyed by the sparkling light of an Islamic-Christian palace, rich in gold and amber , makes Glyndebourne’s staging of Figaro’s wedding a fabulous visual feast (thanks to the creations of Christopher Oram and the lighting of Paule Constable). Relaunched this summer, now with a mostly new cast, Michael Grandage’s 2012 production is one of the two main productions this fall. Visit to Glyndebourne (the other is Bohemian), on the road by the end of November.

Aside from reaching a wider audience, one of the main strengths of the tour is its desire to nurture young talent. The driver of Figaro, Stephanie Childress, is 23 years old. As a violinist, she garnered attention in BBC Young Musician in 2016 and 2019. Now her stage career has taken center stage. His focus and composure resulted in a performance of supple, detailed and assured vitality. With the constant stop-start dialogue, which needs to be as fluid and realistic as everyday conversation, timing is everything. The use of historically informed performance elements – natural trumpets, expertly embellished continuo playing in the fortepiano and cello – resulted in an ideal balance between stage and pit. He rode freely and with spirit.

Dressed in hippy-disco rockets, velvet, waistcoats, flowery kaftans, Count Almaviva’s household could have come out of an Iris Murdoch novel: a group of well-to-do people whose sole occupation is to fall in love with inappropriately, regardless of the moral consequences. The update, especially in this modified staging – no rotating set, no arrival by car in the opening (the curtain remains down) – was skilfully revived by Ian Rutherford and his team. If part of the game was borderline ham, the game chorus jumps and dances a little, whatever. The singing was uniformly excellent, from Henry Waddington’s seasoned and smug Bartolo to Jerwood Young performer Charlotte Bowden in the small but critical role of Barbarina.

Nardus Williams, a soprano of growing reputation and boundless charm, has returned as Countess, with the dignity, grace and fire required. Count by George Humphreys, swaying and sordid; Alexander Miminoshvili’s cunning and clever Figaro; Madeleine Shaw’s imperious Marcellina; Ida Ränzlöv’s lanky Cherubino created a compelling ensemble. Mozart’s divine comedy stands or falls through its Suzanne. Soraya Mafi, a fast rising star, is perfection, clear diction, funny and sharp manners, voice at ease in all the demands of the role. catch this Figaro whether you can.

Vasily Petrenko conducted Mahler’s Symphony No. 8 at the Royal Albert Hall last week. Photography: Andy Paradise

Known since its creation under the nickname Symphony of a Thousand, Mahler’s Symphony No. 8 (1906) exhausts the lexicon of the great. Any attempt to follow the work’s sprawling two-movement form argument is bewildered by the music’s epic 90-minute sweep. Eight soloists, three adult choirs, two children’s choirs and an oversized Royal Philharmonic Orchestra – several hundred musicians in total, a rather impressive number without trying to reach the mythical thousand – performed in front of a full house. Royal Albert Hall last weekend, under the direction of Vasily Petrenko.

This symphony crosses all life and ends, with the final scene of Goethe Faust, in Paradise. From the gargantuan roar of the organ at the start, voices launching into “Veni creator spiritus”, to the phenomenal final climax, this is music of powerful physics. Each member of each choir has been drilled to the highest standards: the Philharmonia Chorus, Bournemouth Symphony Chorus, City of London Choir, Tiffin Boys’ Choir and School Cantorum of Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School, the latter two singing their memory contributions. Above the many levels of singers, an “offstage” brass ensemble took the highest position, for sonic and visual effect.

The Albert Hall felt like its only purpose was to house this grandest, if most unequal enterprise. Petrenko kept the momentum going, with fast speeds and clean textures. A particularly lyrical vocal writing is entrusted to the mezzo-soprano, interpreted in a convincing way by Jennifer Johnston. The three sopranos, Sarah Wegener, Jacquelyn Wagner and Regula Mühlemann, contralto Claudia Huckle, tenor Vincent Wolfsteiner, baritone Benedict Nelson and bass James Platt complete the admirable solo line-up. The event was delayed for two years due to the pandemic. Since, petrenkoThe own transition from conductor of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic to musical director of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra has been accomplished. For anyone mourning the loss of large-scale upsetting events over the past two years, this was redemption.

Star ratings (out of five)
Figaro’s wedding ★★★★★
Mahler “Symphony of a Thousand” ★★★★

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Dissidence and dumplings: served at the Istanbul Biennale https://schlammpeitziger.com/dissidence-and-dumplings-served-at-the-istanbul-biennale/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/dissidence-and-dumplings-served-at-the-istanbul-biennale/ The story goes that in 17th century Germany, dumplings called maultaschen were invented during Lent as a way to hide meat from the all-seeing eyes of God. In Turkey today, people care more about the prying eyes of the state than about God, and dumplings – manti in Turkish – have once again become a […]]]>

The story goes that in 17th century Germany, dumplings called maultaschen were invented during Lent as a way to hide meat from the all-seeing eyes of God. In Turkey today, people care more about the prying eyes of the state than about God, and dumplings – manti in Turkish – have once again become a means and a metaphor for smuggling banned goods past the authorities.

Published as part of the 2022 edition of the Istanbul Biennale, a journal titled dumpling message maintains the spirit of resistance that inspired the
2019 Kayseri dumpling festival, organized in response to the repeated banning of a conference on the social, cultural and economic history of the
town. To celebrate the publication of the first of three issues, the Hrant Dink
Foundation (HDF) organized a reception in the opening week of the Biennale, a
convivial affair in which manti were cooked under the shade of a pomegranate tree for a court full of supporters, journalists and VIPs.

The foundation, which has its headquarters in a quiet street in the Şişli district on the European side of Istanbul, was created in 2007 following the assassination by a Turkish nationalist of journalist Hrant Dink, founding editor of the weekly Turkish-Armenian Agos. It aims to continue the work of the journalist, to advance the causes of democracy in Turkey and to foster cultural relations between Turkey, Armenia and Europe.

To this end, the HDF organizes international conferences “aimed at deepening the understanding of the social, economic, socio-political and cultural changes experienced in different cities of Anatolia in the 19th and 20th centuries”. Events held in cities like Ankara and Izmir were to be followed by a conference in Kayseri, scheduled for October 2019, but it was banned by the local government. Moved to HDF headquarters in Istanbul, the event was again banned, just a day before it was due to take place.

Writing in the number one of dumpling messagewhich is distributed free of charge during
the Biennale and available online, journalist Ayla Jean Yackley describes
how traditional Kayseri dumplings offered a key to talking about the city differently. Instead of a lecture, they landed on the Kayseri dumpling festival – wrapping the forbidden in an innocuous-looking package, just as the monks of 17th-century Germany had done.

Yet there was nothing wrong with the event. Write in the Jobwine expert Levon Bağiş recalls the arrival of the police: “I will never forget the look
of surprise on their faces when they entered, only to see busy women
make manti on the tables. Our conversation with the police commander, which had started on a high note, ended with a plate of manti in his hand which he said was better than the manti made by his wife from Kayseri.

What the police commander had lost sight of was exactly the inspiration of the festival: that manti-making is a communal activity, its repetitive actions the natural accompaniment to conversation.

After seven frantic days of planning and organization, the festival attracted
500 people. Yackley writes: “They came not only to make dumplings, eat and listen to speeches, but to show their solidarity with us and to take a stand against the restrictions imposed on civil society.

The dumpling message, which is a bilingual publication in English and Turkish, is a guarantee of the political sharpness of the 17th edition of the Istanbul Biennale. In previous years, it focused on large public spaces and
although large institutions such as the Pera Museum are involved this time around, exhibits are scattered throughout the city, with an emphasis on smaller, more intimate venues. There is a distinctly dissenting flavor. The comforting aromas of food waft through this year’s program, an evocation of home, hearth and tradition that involves not just the strength that comes from family ties, but the empowerment of women and children.

The Hrant Dink Foundation mantis reception in collaboration with the dumpling message. Photo: Mustafa Kirazli

London-based artist duo Cooking Sections have made a long-term project out of exploring the culture, customs and precious environments embodied in food, and more specifically the complex relationship between food and the climate crisis. . In a small shop in Beyoğlu, they served traditional Turkish puddings made from buffalo milk, including kaymak (a very thick cream made from buffalo milk) and sütlaç (rice pudding). The shop is part of Wallowland, a project commissioned by the Biennale to highlight the plight of Istanbul’s water buffaloes, under threat from the loss of wetlands in the area now dominated by the city’s new airport, one of the most explosive vanity projects commissioned by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Last held in 2019 and delayed for a year due to the pandemic, the Biennale
seems to be considerably more outspoken than three years ago and, to an outsider, conditions in the city seem to have improved in the meantime.

On the one hand, Erdoğan’s creeping desecularization is blatant in
projects such as the vast new mosque in Taksim Square. But in front, it’s the
equally symbolic cultural center of Atatürk, reopened in 2021 and bulwark of secularism and free thought in this increasingly religious state.

The 2019 election of a leftist mayor in Istanbul, Ekrem İmamoğlu, ended a period of intense political wrangling, and seemed to hold promise for better times. Three years ago, riot control vehicles
stood in Taksim Square with their engines constantly running, manned by a very muscular staff, barely able to hold the Alsatian slavers to their side. In 2022, the police maintain their constant presence, but the black armored trucks are gone, and the dogs, for now, are back in their kennels.

In fact, it looks like Taksim Square is no less scary than it used to be. Indonesian activist and performance artist Arahmaiani produced an iteration of his flag project for the Biennale, which was presented for a procession through the grounds of the Gashouse Museum. It all sounded very liberal, but one viewer observed that despite using the only common lexicon of protest – “Equality”, “Justice”, “Struggle” – the rally allegedly resulted in violence and mass arrests had it happened in Taksim Square.

Beyond the vastness of Taksim Square and its ever-increasing quota of brand-new hotel blocks, Istanbul is a city of remarkable complexity, its networks of small streets lined with haphazard arrangements of impossibly flimsy and incredibly old patched up with duct tape and other eccentric materials. So narrow that they might have been built for the city’s cats, not its inhabitants, these streets, when nominally passable, are often set at slopes extreme enough to test the driver and engine, their corners hidden out of reach of the most knowledgeable inhabitants.

In one of these streets of the old district of Fatih, a fishmonger had set up in front of his shop, cutting off the heads of fish under the watchful eye of a
cat. In front of him, a small door at the bottom of a nested flight of stairs
of sight. Once inside the Küçük Mustafa Paşa Hammam, a 15th-century Turkish bath, the space takes on the proportions of a
church, with smaller rooms radiating around large central spaces, the
fully separate male and female facilities. The hammam was abandoned for many years but now restored, this ancient hidden place
takes on its full meaning within the framework of the Biennale, for which it hosts a
sound installation. Private, yet communal, it is a place of quiet resistance in the very foundations of the city.

A very different sense of community reigns over the Bread and Puppet Theater, although as its name suggests, breaking bread is key to the philosophy of the veteran team, one of the oldest political theater companies nonprofit in the United States. .

Operating from a Vermont farm since the 1970s, the Bread and Puppet Theater was founded on New York’s Lower East Side in 1963 by Peter
Schumann, “based on the baking and non-market distribution of
bread at moments created by art”. They participated in the Vietnam War protests in the 1960s and continued to produce theater that takes to the streets as much as it invites people inside. With titles like Our Domestic Resurrection Circus, Leaf smelling of moonlight and Wounds of Vietnamthey sit somewhere between carnival, event, and peace protest, urging action with an unbalanced yet wholly sane sense of purpose.


In the golden light of a late September afternoon, an assortment of banner-waving teenagers and bizarre creatures made from trash can lids, papier-mache and old clothes scurried across the grass outside. exterior of Istanbul Bilgi University. Among them was John Bell, a theater historian and puppeteer who began working with the Bread and Puppet Theater in the 1970s.
practice his trombone and check that the many performers, former and
young, were ready for the evening performance, he told me that Demons
of Society had been set up in just two weeks. Designed in collaboration with the university and Turkish puppeteer Cengiz Özek, the performers were drawn from the local community. “We expected to work with 25, and about 65 showed up,” Bell said, before being called out by longtime colleague Clare Dolan, who arrived on stilts, along with a protege wearing stilts.

For all its trippy inscrutability, the performance itself, shyly described as
“talking to the urgencies of the present moment”, was paradoxically audacious in its uncompromising rejection of restrictions on freedom. There was a paperclip, and something that seemed to be part plunger, and something else made from a twisted cake pan. “Be careful!” read a banner, “I am beautiful!” read another. It was crazy, joyful and totally unequivocal:
when people are silenced, they find other ways to speak.

The 17th Istanbul Biennale runs until November 20

Florence Hallett is a freelance writer and art critic

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Youssef Nabil’s solo exhibition in Dubai is a serene journey through a dreamlike landscape https://schlammpeitziger.com/youssef-nabils-solo-exhibition-in-dubai-is-a-serene-journey-through-a-dreamlike-landscape/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 04:14:32 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/youssef-nabils-solo-exhibition-in-dubai-is-a-serene-journey-through-a-dreamlike-landscape/ It is impossible to forget the work of Youssef Nabil. Between memory and imagination, film and photography, monochrome and bold colours, to experience an exhibition of Nabil’s work is to enter the dreamlike landscape of a considerate and vulnerable artist. Nabil’s latest solo exhibition, titled The Beautiful Voyage, currently on view at The Third Line […]]]>

It is impossible to forget the work of Youssef Nabil.

Between memory and imagination, film and photography, monochrome and bold colours, to experience an exhibition of Nabil’s work is to enter the dreamlike landscape of a considerate and vulnerable artist.

Nabil’s latest solo exhibition, titled The Beautiful Voyage, currently on view at The Third Line Gallery on Dubai’s Alserkal Avenue, is a curated selection of the work of the internationally acclaimed artist, photographer and filmmaker that draws the viewer and holds him in suspense.

The selection of works, from 2016 to the present day, includes 15 photographs and the regional debut of Nabil’s fourth video, also called The beautiful journey.

Photographic works in the exhibition include beach views with silhouettes of birds flying against a blazing sky and horizon; winding roads without cars; swaying, double-exposed palm trees against a picturesque backdrop of a sunset on a beach; or self-portraits of Nabil facing mountainous terrain, cityscapes and starry skies, reclining as he floats above a shimmering sea.

“These are all the questions I’ve been asking myself recently about our journey in life,” says Nabil. The National.

“It’s about all of us and our fragility in the face of time and death. It’s a reminder of our surreal nature living life, knowing that we’re all here for a limited time.

The images vary from light touches of Nabil’s hand and color manipulation to others with a silkscreen or painterly quality. Although diverse in subject matter, the works are brought together by Nabil’s cinematic perspective and his ability to translate the monumental and the delicate in a subliminal and sensitive way.

The text appears on a number of self-portraits. Statements, prompts, or parts of poems act as subtitles or credits at the end of a movie. Nabil references cinema, contemporary culture and art history and combines these influences to shape his own visual vocabulary that feels cinematic, nostalgic and symbolic.

“I grew up in Egypt watching a lot of movies, mostly on TV,” says Nabil.

“I loved those old Egyptian films because they introduced me to the idea of ​​the camera and its power, being the first and only invention that can hold time and an image that we can watch for years to come. late.”

Nabil first became known for his unique portraits of Egyptian and Western film stars and artists. This has included Egyptian actors such as Omar Sharif and Faten Hamama, belly dancer and actress Fifi Abdou, renowned Iranian visual artist Shirin Neshat, legendary French actress Catherine Deneuve, concept and performance artist Marina Abramovic, the actor Robert De Niro and singer Alicia Keys. Nabil’s portraits are fascinating not only for the way he captures his sitters, but also for his distinct technique of hand coloring on gelatin silver prints.

Like the rest of Nabil’s work, whether self-portraits or imaginary landscapes, they reveal through technique, composition and thoughtful use of color how we romanticize memories in beautiful images imbued with melancholy.

“I admired all these beautiful Egyptian actors, and to my surprise as a child, they were all dead,” says Nabil when asked about the influence of Egyptian cinema on his work.

“It was a shock to me to find out that I had been in love with all these beautiful but dead people. I wanted to work with the camera later in life, I wanted to be an artist.

Nabil’s latest video The beautiful journey (2021) stars his muse, actress Charlotte Rampling. The eight-minute autobiographical video is a portrait of the relationship between mother and son, childhood, longing and loss.

This is the first film that Nabil has made and in which he appears and it opens with his mother reciting Ithaca, the poem by CP Cavafy that she had read to him as a child in Cairo. The film continues with superb intimate scenes of Rampling reciting Nabil’s story, written by him.

“This project is my most personal project,” says Nabil.

“I asked my mother to recite my favorite poem… and I’m also in front of my camera on film for the first time. It’s very emotional for me on all levels, from writing it to editing, passing by looking at it in exhibitions.

The film is an extension of Nabil’s photographic work. It also seems like a natural step for Nabil in his artistic practice.

“Photography is what films are all about, and as an artist working with photography and inspired by cinema, making films came very naturally to me,” he says.

“I can’t say what cinema brings that photography doesn’t, or the opposite. For me, these are two different mediums and two different modes of expression.

Through his sensitive way of thinking and feeling, whether in photography or film, Nabil’s ability, unrelated to the subject, to imbue an ethereal quality into his work is unparalleled.

Youssef Nabil’s personal exhibition is presented at The Third Line on Alserkal Avenue until next Friday

Updated: October 22, 2022, 04:11

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‘Documentary now!’ It’s pure catnip, 100% movie-nerd – Rolling Stone https://schlammpeitziger.com/documentary-now-its-pure-catnip-100-movie-nerd-rolling-stone/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 22:05:49 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/documentary-now-its-pure-catnip-100-movie-nerd-rolling-stone/ For more than half a century, Documentary now! gave us the best of Truth cinema, introducing generations and generations of documentarians to viewers across the country. Who can forget when DA Pennebaker first unveiled his groundbreaking Dylan documentary Do not look back on the show in the early spring of 1967, just before he brought […]]]>

For more than half a century, Documentary now! gave us the best of Truth cinema, introducing generations and generations of documentarians to viewers across the country. Who can forget when DA Pennebaker first unveiled his groundbreaking Dylan documentary Do not look back on the show in the early spring of 1967, just before he brought it to the hippies and pranksters of Haight Street? Or the controversy that erupted when the series defied the wishes of its sponsors and broadcast Barbara Kopple Harlan County USA. in 1976? (It would win the Best Documentary Oscar the following year.) Or when DN gave Michael Moore a huge boost, thanks to the TV premiere of Roger and me in 1989? As long-time animator Dame Helen Mirren put it, it’s “the definitive collection of non-fiction films.” And this beloved TV staple remains the gold standard for bringing you the whole truth and nothing but 24 frames per second….

The intro above is, of course, an outright lie. (Other than the part on Harlan winning the Oscar. That’s right.) Then again, so is everything else Documentary now!, in addition to his very real affection for the subjects he parodies. It is possible to watch this series and does not immediately realize that everything is completely and totally false; its dedication to reproducing the look of different cinema styles, vintage film stocks and eras past, all with the utmost fidelity, is second to none. (They even used the same lens in order to perfectly capture the look of a particular artwork. Not the same type of lens — exact same lens used by the original documentarian.) Until you start to realize that, wait a second… is that old woman living in the Hamptons circa 1975 actually Bill Hader with a blindfold? And doesn’t this Inuit hunter from a 1920s newsreel look like a Fred Armisen look-alike? If there’s a better extended cinephile joke than this mockumentary anthology, we’ve yet to witness it. A subscription to the Criterion Channel and participation in at least three different Film Twitter Flame Wars should be required to view it.

The brainchild of Armisen, Hader, comrade SNL actor Seth Meyers and director Rhys Thomas, Documentary now! works on the principle that live imitation or detail-oriented Memorex is the sincerest form of flattery – and that the more real something looks, the funnier it will be when you send it or fuck it happily. Many episodes are hilarious on their own, because who wouldn’t find a performance artist played by Cate Blanchett drinking milk from a bowl and shouting “Me! UN M! HU-MANNN! at a cat funny? But if you live and breathe documentaries, or just cinema in general, you’ll appreciate what they do all the more. It’s 100% pure, uncut catnip for movie nerds. And with the new season of the show (its fourth, not his 53rd; the idea that the show predates the Nixon administration is just another part of its commitment to the bit) October 19-Nov 9 on IFC, this comedy can tick off a few other classic/popular docs from its success list.

The two-part film airing tonight, “Soldier of Illusion”, is an excellent example of the methodology of the whole project: take a well-known film or group of films – in this case, the documentary work of Werner Herzog – and try to recreate everything. about them down to Super-16mm grain in slightly faded images. Then add a generous amount of absurdity. Alexander Skarsgard does a better-than-average version of a Herzog accent that has almost become a self-caricature of Teutonic severity. Savvy viewers will notice that his behind-the-scenes look at an out-of-control production resembles that of Les Blank. The burden of dreams, which relates the achievement of Fitzcarraldo; the appearance of a wide-eyed mad actor played by August Diehl instantly brings to mind My best friend, the portrait of the director of Klaus Kinski.

But they also added the fact that this avatar of Werner is doing a CBS sitcom (Single nanny!) in the middle of a Russian no man’s land. Deep references divided by ridiculousness equals comedic genius. You can appreciate the attention to getting it even better than the real thing and if not, you’ll probably cringe at a bullshit German actor yelling at a jumping and locking dancer in front of an audience of shepherds in the studio.

The rest of the season’s episodes stick to this notion of perfect parody plus an incongruous element or unlikely setting. “How They Threw Rocks” takes an epic flashback of sports victory at the When they were kings and transposes it to a 1974 league match involving two Welshmen throwing rocks at each other until the other falls. (Whoever did these fake BBC TV animated graphics deserves 22 Emmys.) at suburban British hairdressers trying to photograph their annual hairdressing catalogues. (Once again, Cate Blanchett for the win!) Besides having the greatest title ever, “My Monkey Grifter” will ensure you never think of the tasteless, award-winning My octopus teacher again the same way. As with last season’s “Finding Gary Larson,” which gracefully fired a flamethrower at first-person narcissism, this is an unusually scathing look at a subgenre that deserves to be mocked – a letter in poison pen instead of a valentine.

Will Robson-Scott/Broadway Video/IFC/AMC

Every season has its ups and downs, and this one is no different. However, each season also gets a transcendental half hour, and this new batch of Documentary now! the episode drops its lead at the very end. In season 3, it was “Co-Op”, a note-for-note revamp of Pennebaker Company: Original Recording doc which probably helped him get a release from Criterion Collection. If you knew the source material, you realized that this entry was not only funny but brilliant, monumental, a masterpiece of satirical Sondheim ribbing. “Finding Thrill” is perhaps the one that leaves casual moviegoers smiling softly and shrugging their shoulders, even though they recognize the heart in it, while moviegoers swoon. A take-off of later works by Agnès Varda (The Gleaners and me, The Beaches of Agnès, Faces Places), he nails both the philosophical spirit, the playful asides and the borderline personality of his excursions with camera and travelogue. It helps that Call my agents Lillian Rovere also does an amazing fake-Agnes. Again, if you know and love these movies, and miss the late big little giant of French cinema, it’s a sweet riot.

But then this “cinematic essay” on the director, here named Ida Leos, in search of her joy of living focuses on a notorious segment of Faces Places, when Varda went to see her old friend Jean-Luc Godard in Switzerland. He was not at home when they arrived, but had scribbled down some sort of note, referring to her late husband Jacques Demy. She took it as an insult and started crying. The fact that she died in 2019 without apparently resolving this possible sleight of hand with her new wave compatriot only makes the sequence more tragic.

“Finding Frisson” takes this scene and, for lack of a better word, “corrects” it. Here, the replacement Godard is a nursing home; Varda’s character sees it. He seems exhausted from life, which was the same word Godard himself would have said before he died in September. And this time, the two have the moment of life, brotherhood and equality that the real Varda sought and never received from the gentleman MIA. It’s such a tender and beautiful moment, smuggled in half an hour that riffs on every artistic quirk and cinematic trick she employed. The spectacle has always been a mash note for documentaries that Hader, Armisen and Co. have admired. This episode is their love letter to other moviegoers. He knows a handful of us are laughing through tears.

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Athlone Castle is hosting a free show for families later this month https://schlammpeitziger.com/athlone-castle-is-hosting-a-free-show-for-families-later-this-month/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 19:23:15 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/athlone-castle-is-hosting-a-free-show-for-families-later-this-month/ Published: Sat Oct 15, 2022 8:23 PM Athlone Castle Visitor Center will host ‘My Delicious Hat’, a unique free event created by Westmeath performance artist and storyteller, Paul Timoney, on Saturday 22 October. “My Delicious Hat” is a rather peculiar version of the story of how Cú Chulainn got his name. This brilliantly entertaining show […]]]>


Athlone Castle Visitor Center will host ‘My Delicious Hat’, a unique free event created by Westmeath performance artist and storyteller, Paul Timoney, on Saturday 22 October.

“My Delicious Hat” is a rather peculiar version of the story of how Cú Chulainn got his name. This brilliantly entertaining show combines surreal, silly, funny and rather interactive poems with activities that kids will really enjoy.

Children are encouraged to join the “maestro-general-acting-the-messer” and prepare to be captivated by Paul’s storytelling!

Paul Timoney is one of the most unique voices in spoken word, an award-winning Irish poet and performer, who has worked as a teacher and creative activity facilitator for many years.

This event will take place at Athlone Castle on Saturday October 22 at 11:30am. This show is suitable for children from 7 to 12 years old. Advance booking is essential via 090 6442130 or info@athlonecastle.ie as places will be limited. Children must be accompanied by an adult, parent. This free event does not include entry to the Athlone Castle Visitor Center.

See www.athlonecastle.ie/events for more information or check out Athlone Castle on Instagram.

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