united states – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 16:58:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://schlammpeitziger.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png united states – Schlammpeitziger http://schlammpeitziger.com/ 32 32 25th edition of the Charlotte S. Huck Festival inspires many | Education https://schlammpeitziger.com/25th-edition-of-the-charlotte-s-huck-festival-inspires-many-education/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 16:58:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/25th-edition-of-the-charlotte-s-huck-festival-inspires-many-education/ The McLinn couple receive the 2022 Charlotte S. Huck Award. Marjorie Arnett is in purple and Char Burgess is at right. Redlands Community News photo by Siw Heede The 25th annual Charlotte S. Huck Children’s Literature Festival was about to begin and the conference room was buzzing with the activity of 180 teachers, librarians, educators […]]]>






The McLinn couple receive the 2022 Charlotte S. Huck Award. Marjorie Arnett is in purple and Char Burgess is at right.




The 25th annual Charlotte S. Huck Children’s Literature Festival was about to begin and the conference room was buzzing with the activity of 180 teachers, librarians, educators and other children’s literature enthusiasts.

“It was through reading that I learned perspective and appreciation for different points of view in this world,” said Mario Martinez, dean of the School of Education at the University of Redlands, in his keynote address. opening. “It is through reading that we develop and grow.”

Don Tate, author and illustrator, described in his keynote how he only became an avid reader when he was 21 years old. That’s when he found a book with his culture and background. That book was “Black Boy” by Richard Wright.

“I was starved for books as a kid,” said author and illustrator James Ransome in his presentation. He grew up in a house without books. When he was a teenager he moved to New Jersey, “The first thing I did was get a library card.”

Author and illustrator Salina Yoon came to the United States at the age of 4 from Korea and did not speak the language.

“I couldn’t read the words, but of course I could read the pictures,” she said.

Growing up, she was shy and quiet.

“‘Penguin and Pinecone’ propelled me out into the world, it helped me come out of my shell.”

The next day, Raphaël Lopez’s story was a little different from the others.

“We had books from floor to ceiling. I grew up surrounded by books,” he said.

He grew up in Mexico City with architect parents.

Each background started and ended with books and how they changed lives. Likewise, the sessions covered everything from comedy to literacy to the life of Ashley Bryan.

The prestigious Charlotte S. Huck Prize was awarded to the couple Claudette and Michael McLinn. McLinn is the executive director of the Center for the Study of Multicultural Children’s Literature. She served as Chair of the Caldecott Committee in 2022.

“We appreciate their support of this conference for many, many years,” said Charlotte Burgess, niece and namesake of Charlotte S. Huck.

At the conference, messages centered on the importance of diversity in literature, to show all children that they matter.

“Seeing artwork about your people has inspired many African American children to become artists,” said James Ransome.

His art has been featured in over 70 books spanning a 32 year career.

Another important message was the level of support authors and illustrators received growing up. One positive encouragement from a teacher or librarian was enough.

“Teachers and librarians are the most supportive people,” said Salina Yoon.

“I was overwhelmed,” said Pamela Martinez, youth services librarian at the AK Smiley Public Library. “All the presenters, main sessions, small sessions were very personable. I felt like I was inside their story.

She has been coming to the festival for 20 years.

“It’s like Christmas,” said Jamilah Muhammad, librarian at Bear Valley Elementary. She mentioned the great level of excitement that reigned at the conference.

Grade 6 teacher Toi Bolden from Ontario agreed, “I just think it was fabulous. It inspires me as a teacher. And it is important to re-inspire yourself as a teacher to go back and inspire children.

Many participants had been coming for years.

“When I heard Don [Tate] speak yesterday, I think it’s the best start we’ve ever had,” said founding coordinator Marjorie Arnett. “Then Ralph [Fletcher] was talking and it was like that with each of the speakers.

She said they’ve worked to create diversity in the program every year, “This year it just worked out.”

“[The festival] continues to be what my aunt wanted – a small event with opportunities to meet authors and illustrators,” Burgess said, “We think it’s just the most wonderful combination of people. She added, “We can’t wait to see you next year. Bring a friend!”







Round table

Panel discussion by the four keynote speakers, left to right, Don Tate, Raphael Lopez, Salina Yoon and James Ransome.




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A steep | Dave Molter https://schlammpeitziger.com/a-steep-dave-molter/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/a-steep-dave-molter/ Here’s a joke for you: four writers get into a van. They are on their way to visit a Ford F-150 pickup truck assembly plant in Norfolk, Virginia. They’ve never met before, so they break the ice by complaining about gas prices. “It’s awful!” says the first writer. “I can’t afford to drive anymore!” “Tell […]]]>

Here’s a joke for you: four writers get into a van. They are on their way to visit a Ford F-150 pickup truck assembly plant in Norfolk, Virginia. They’ve never met before, so they break the ice by complaining about gas prices.

“It’s awful!” says the first writer. “I can’t afford to drive anymore!”

“Tell me about that!” writer number two responds. “I have three kids that I have to drive into town to football games!”

“I wish I hadn’t bought that SUV by now!” said the third.

After a brief pause, the fourth writer, from the Netherlands, said softly, “You know…I’ve been paying $4 a gallon for years.”

“Yes, but it’s America!” says writer number two.

I was one of those writers. It was 1999, and the average price of a gallon of unleaded gasoline in the United States had just hit $1.17.

This trip came to mind last week after paying $4.15 a gallon for gas on my way home from a meeting. Typically, I forgot to buy gas before leaving. When I got home, the red needle on my fuel gauge was just below “E”.

So I stopped at the first station I found. I don’t drive much and the previous time I bought gas I paid $3.65 a gallon. I was not happy. I remember when gas was 28 cents a gallon. I could fill up my Volkswagen Beetle for less than $3 and drive all week. When gas soared to the then unthinkable price of 45 cents a gallon during the OPEC oil embargo in 1974, I stood in line every other day to buy the number of gallons allowed that day. Traveling musician at the time, I had no choice.

The day I wrote this column, I paid $4.29 a gallon for gas. I still wasn’t happy, but in the face of adversity I try to keep what the Brits call a “stiff upper lip”. The saying comes from the observation that when you are ready to cry, your upper lip quivers. “Stiff upper lip, old man! To continue!”

Stiff upper lips helped the British overcome the German Blitz in World War II. Contemporary America, I think, lacks a collective stiff upper lip.

Unable to cope with the prospect of Major League Baseball being canceled or being asked to wear face masks for a while, our upper lips quiver. In the face of high but still falling gas prices, on average, $3 a gallon below those of most “Western” countries, we cry, “But this is America!”

Contemporary Americans would never have survived the nearly six years of rationing of food, gasoline, and other commodities that our ancestors endured during World War II.

Stiff upper lip, America! It might help keep our mouths shut.

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River Clyde: Simone Buchholz on how Glasgow inspired crime thriller https://schlammpeitziger.com/river-clyde-simone-buchholz-on-how-glasgow-inspired-crime-thriller/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:30:06 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/river-clyde-simone-buchholz-on-how-glasgow-inspired-crime-thriller/ SIMONE Buchholz tells how Glasgow became the heart of her latest crime thriller River Clyde. It all started almost two decades ago when the German author arrived in Scotland to visit friends. Passionate about football, she was taken to see a game at Celtic Park. It was 2005 and a young striker caught his eye. […]]]>

SIMONE Buchholz tells how Glasgow became the heart of her latest crime thriller River Clyde. It all started almost two decades ago when the German author arrived in Scotland to visit friends.

Passionate about football, she was taken to see a game at Celtic Park. It was 2005 and a young striker caught his eye. His name was Nicky Riley, a player on the bench for the local team. His cheeky smile and freckles made her smile.

At this time, Hamburg-based Buchholz was planning a new series of books. She had yet to name the central character – a fearless state attorney who is half-German, half-American, with Scottish roots – and inspiration struck as she sat in the stands that day- the.

“What’s funny is that all of my protagonists are named after football players,” she says. “The vouchers are named after players from FC St Pauli, where I live. Bad guys usually play or used to play for Hamburger SV.

“I was in Glasgow on a trip and went to the Celtic stadium. It was around the time that I started thinking about this protagonist. I thought, ‘Maybe her name is Riley?’ »

And, with that, the bold and memorable Chastity Riley was born. The curious thing, says Buchholz, is that Nicky Riley never started for Celtic that day, but in her mind she can see him flying around the pitch.

Does the footballer, who after leaving Celtic in 2010 played for Dundee, Peterhead and now Linlithgow Rose, know that he inspired this character? “No, no, no,” she said with a shy laugh.

A visit to Glasgow’s Celtic Park in 2005 inspired German author Simone Buchholz. Photo: Nick Ponty

Buchholz, 50, has since written a string of bestselling books centered on Chastity Riley. She looks back fondly on that visit to Glasgow and thinks serendipity played a part.

“Years later, it turned out to be absolutely right to name him after a Celtic football player,” she says, referring to the Glasgow link that proves essential in his new novel, River Clyde, which is published this week.

The award-winning author, well known in her native Germany as a political and cultural activist, was on tour for her novel Mexikoring (published in English as Mexico Street) when she struck up an enlightening conversation about the development of the character related to Chastity Riley.

“My wonderful colleague said, ‘Oh my God, you hurt her all the time. Don’t you think she has to be fixed once? You have to give her some kind of healing to make her happy…” We spent this long evening together and talked about the problem.”

READ MORE: Outlander star Sam Heughan talks Scotland, his future ambitions and filming the hit TV show

A few weeks later, Buchholz was attending the Bloody Scotland detective writing festival in Stirling and chatting with a podcaster. “She was like, ‘It’s funny that her name is Riley because my name is also Riley, which is an Irish-Scottish name, and I’m from Glasgow. “”

Thinking about it afterwards, Buchholz knew what was coming next for his character. “Suddenly I realized, ‘I have to fix it.’ I felt for the first time that maybe I should give her a home and a way to learn more about her family and her roots.

“She’s half American; her father died when she was 20 and her mother left her when she was two. Maybe I have to send her somewhere to her house and maybe it’s Scotland. I started researching and traveled to Glasgow. Very quickly, I felt that yes, that was where she belonged.

“For me, it sparked a kind of magic. I still can’t say why exactly. I walked around and saw things through his eyes. She felt at home there; she felt safe and like she belonged.

HeraldScotland: German detective novelist Simone Buchholz.  Photo: Gerald von ForisGerman crime perpetrator Simone Buchholz. Photo: Gerald von Foris

River Clyde follows Chastity Riley as she escapes the heartbreak and tragedy of her life in Hamburg and travels to Glasgow, summoned to her great-great-grandfather’s birthplace by a mysterious letter suggesting she has inherited a house.

There, she meets an important figure who knew her late great-aunt, uncovering dark and painful secrets from her family’s past.

What is striking about Buchholz’s writing is how skillfully it captures the beating heart of Glasgow. This is not the postcard version, but rather a portrait without blinding. She appreciates and understands the nuances of the city’s geography and socio-economic landscape.

River Clyde is very much like an alternative love letter to Glasgow. Much of the story takes place in the east, and you can tell Chastity Riley – and Buchholz for that matter – felt very comfortable there as the character discovers her Scottish roots.

“When I arrived in Glasgow and Chastity popped into my mind, I knew she’d like the gritty part,” says Buchholz. “I live in St Pauli and she lives in St Pauli, which is the harbor area. It’s gritty – it’s not the rich and posh part of Hamburg.

“For me, the West End and Kelvingrove are wonderful – I loved dining there – but, for her, I knew that had to be the gritty part.”

READ MORE: Author Maggie Craig reveals her research to uncover Culloden’s harrowing secrets

Buchholz began researching how many Scots emigrated at the end of the 19th century in search of a better life across the Atlantic. “His great-great-grandfather emigrated to the United States,” she says, explaining that the character’s father was from a steel town in North Carolina.

In River Clyde, Chastity Riley traces her family tree to Bluevale Street in Dennistoun. Buchholz spent many hours exploring East Glasgow and learning about the history. “I knew I had to go,” she said. “If I found something, I would find it there.

“I have friends in Glasgow and when I asked them, ‘Where would she go? Where would she like? They were like, ‘Let’s go, this is his part of town.’ “I was so lucky because my friends took me to the Hielan Jessie at Gallowgate,” she adds, a smile in her voice. “The Hielan Jessie is the best place. I really hope he survived the pandemic.

River Clyde contains an impressive pub crawl of Glasgow’s iconic hostels. As well as the Hielan Jessie, Chastity Riley enjoyed a drink at Tennent’s Bar, Stravaigin and The Doublet (and later The Anchor Inn and The Perch Cafe in Garelochhead).

HeraldScotland: The Doublet in Glasgow.  Photo: Kirsty AndersonThe Doublet in Glasgow. Photo: Kirsty Anderson

Did Buchholz have fun researching these parts of the book? “Of course,” she said, laughing. “My friends helped me a lot. It was lovely. The Glasgow people I met were so friendly. It was so easy to do research in Glasgow.

Hamburg, she says, is renowned for being a friendly place, but the welcome from Glasgow has upset her. “You go somewhere, you order a beer and after two seconds you have new friends. They ask: ‘Where are you from?’ You start talking and you have a group of friends.

“It’s absolutely wonderful for an author who does research. The people are very friendly, open, kind and welcoming. It struck me. »

READ MORE: A forensic eye: Val McDermid deciphers our fascination with gritty TV crime drama

It is no coincidence that the novel takes its name from the Glasgow River, the Clyde also being a sentient being – waiting and watching – within its pages.

Buchholz felt an immediate and strong connection. “I live not far from our river in Hamburg – the Elbe – and I go there often,” she says. “I love being there, drinking a beer, watching the river and thinking about everything.

“When I came to Glasgow to do research for the book, I discovered that the Clyde and our river in Hamburg, the Elbe, are somewhat similar geographically as they cut the city into two halves. There is the northern part and the southern part.

HeraldScotland: View across the River Clyde in Glasgow looking east.  Photo: Colin MearnsView over the River Clyde in Glasgow looking east. Photo: Colin Mearns

“The big difference – what moved me – is that in Hamburg the river has a very central function and it is one of the biggest ports in Europe.

“The river is very lively and people love to sit by it. There are plenty of restaurants and bars – the river is important for city life. And the River Clyde is just the opposite. It looked to me like he was just lying there, dividing the city into two halves.

“It was a bit sad. Maybe it depends a bit on the weather, but our weather is not so much better in Hamburg. For me it [the Clyde] seems to be lonely and emotional and dark, just hanging out.

When Buchholz finished the first draft of River Clyde in 2020, she felt something was missing, “an extra voice, something that brings it all together.” Sitting on the banks of the Elbe, sipping a beer with a musician friend, she began to think of a solution.

READ MORE: Five great Scottish thrillers and mystery novels hit our TV screens

“I told him about my problem and said, ‘Something is missing. What would you do if you were writing music and you felt an extra sound was missing?

“He said, ‘I’d do something like dark ropes. Maybe look at the river, something like a river…’ I thought, ‘Maybe River Clyde isn’t just the title? Maybe it’s a character. Maybe it’s the voice I need to pull it all together? I tried and it felt good.”

River Clyde by Simone Buchholz is published by Orenda Books on Thursday, priced at £8.99

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DL Hughley compares Whitney Houston and Marvin Gaye’s versions of the national anthem https://schlammpeitziger.com/dl-hughley-compares-whitney-houston-and-marvin-gayes-versions-of-the-national-anthem/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 22:08:39 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/dl-hughley-compares-whitney-houston-and-marvin-gayes-versions-of-the-national-anthem/ Ask anyone which singer has performed the best version of the national anthem, they’ll more than likely answer with the singer hailed as “The Voice”: Whitney Houston. Houston performed his signature rendition ahead of the 1991 Super Bowl. The song was released as a single twice in a decade and made chart history. Despite that, […]]]>

Ask anyone which singer has performed the best version of the national anthem, they’ll more than likely answer with the singer hailed as “The Voice”: Whitney Houston. Houston performed his signature rendition ahead of the 1991 Super Bowl. The song was released as a single twice in a decade and made chart history. Despite that, DL Hughley thinks there’s a performance that tops Houston’s.

Whitney Houston sings the national anthem at the 1991 Tampa, Florida, Superbowl XXV | George Rose/Getty Images

DL Hughley Says Marvin Gaye’s Version of ‘The National Anthem’ Is Better Than Whitney Houston’s

Hughley recently interviewed Vlad TV and spoke of their experiences witnessing some of the greatest entertainers and athletes of all time. During the conversation, Hughley gave an example of the first time he saw Houston play. He had attended a concert by his favorite artist but was so blown away by Houston that he didn’t even care who he originally went to the show for.

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Irish performances for Irish Heritage Month | THIRTEEN https://schlammpeitziger.com/irish-performances-for-irish-heritage-month-thirteen/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 21:29:10 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/irish-performances-for-irish-heritage-month-thirteen/ Fields in Ireland, and a hint of rain that keeps them green. From the episode Simple Comforts: Ireland by Mary Berry. March is Irish-American Heritage Month – a celebration of the culture of a small island to which 31.5 million Americans feel connected; Irish is the second largest ancestry group listed in the US census […]]]>

Fields in Ireland, and a hint of rain that keeps them green. From the episode Simple Comforts: Ireland by Mary Berry.

March is Irish-American Heritage Month – a celebration of the culture of a small island to which 31.5 million Americans feel connected; Irish is the second largest ancestry group listed in the US census after German. The highlight of the month is St. Patrick’s Day on March 17, when the color to wear is green, representing the Emerald Isle of Ireland.

New York City rolls out the St. Patrick’s Day Parade down Fifth Avenue starting at 11 a.m. and people from all walks of life join in the festivities at Irish pubs and taverns – the city has more per capita than any other, according to a St. Patrick’s Day. thematic overview by Wallet Hub. If you’re lucky, you might catch a traditional Irish music session in a pub when musicians come together to play traditional Irish songs and socialize. Irish hospitality is paired with a gift for conversation – the Irish are always up for ‘the Craic’ – an Irish Gaelic term that boils down to sharing the latest news and gossip with generous humor and wit.

THIRTEEN, the New York-area PBS station, is happy to bring music and performances into homes in March via specials, as well as shows that reveal Ireland’s beauty and history.

Ireland in music: Sclimpini


The title of this new musical series is simple, but does the Irish Gaelic word sclimpíní mean? Manchán Magan, author of the book Thirty-two words for Field: lost words from the Irish landscapeexplains: “sclimpiní refers to supernatural lights that dance before our eyes.

Irish eyes smile in the series Ireland in music: Sclimpini, in which Irish-based musicians perform on location in the Irish countryside and towns. Episodes include poetry with actor Stephen Rea (Flesh and blood, the crying game) and even a whistler! Locations include Dublin’s Temple Bar and Millennium Bridge, the Burren in County Clare, the castles of County Westmeath and more. Broadcasts begin Sunday, April 3 at 7:30 p.m. (see Schedule), but you can stream episodes in advance.

Irish Dancing: Steps to Freedom

Thirteen tunes Irish Dancing: Steps to Freedom several times from Thursday, March 17 at 8:30 p.m. to March 21 at 1 a.m. (see schedule).

Breathtaking Irish dancing performances trace the evolution of this global dance phenomenon, from its early Celtic origins and peasant dance roots to its blending with the slave cultures of the Caribbean and Africa. Hosted by young Irish dancing phenom and viral TikTok sensation Morgan Bullock from Virginia, the program reveals how Irish dancing is a story of religious influence, cultural fusion, mass migration and revolution. Archive performances feature Riverdance and Lord of the Dance star Michael Flatley and Irish dancing master Jean Butler, among many others.

The program features Irish dance artists from New York to Ireland.

A young black woman wearing Irish dancing shoes stands on her toes on the Irish dancing board in the middle of NYC street intersection.  She wears black tights and a black zipped sweatshirt.

Irish dance artist Morgan Bullock dances at the intersection of Delancey Street and Orchard Street on the Lower East Side in New York

Six men wear black shoes and dance on a wooden plank placed on the pier at the water's edge.  The sun is setting behind them.

Irish dancing performance at Battery Park in New York.

Two tall young men, twins, are in the air with their bodies upright above two boards for Irish dancing which are placed in the path along the body of water.

Gardiner Brothers in Steps to Freedom.

Cormac Begley and Stephaine Keane perform at the water’s edge.

For live Irish dancing, check out the Trinity Irish Dance Company (TIDC) March 15-19 at the Joyce Theatre. The theater seats just under 500 people in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, and every seat is good.

Trinity: Classically Irish

Conor Murphy, Emmett O’Hanlon and Ronan Scolard.

Thirteen tunes Trinity: Classically Irish Thursday, March 17 at 10 p.m. and Saturday, March 19 at 3 p.m. (see schedule) or stream now.

A New Yorker is part of this trio of tenors celebrating in song the month of Irish-American heritage. Their concert with the Gulf Coast Symphony in Fort Myers, Florida includes ‘Toora Loora’, ‘Red Is the Rose’, ‘Carrickfergus’, ‘Danny Boy’, ‘The Spanish Lady’, ‘Shenandoah’, ‘Raglan Road’ , “The Rocky Road to Dublin”, “Grace”, “Isle of Hope”, “The Fields of Athenry” and “The Parting Glass”.

Emmett O’Hanlon was born in New York to Irish parents. After earning a Masters in Music from the Juilliard School, his work as lead vocalist with Celtic Thunder took him to hundreds of cities in the United States, Canada and Australia.

Conor Murphy has Irish opera in his blood – his great-grandmother, Mimi Devitt, was a famous Irish operatic soprano before World War II, who earned the nickname ‘Mimi’ for her well-received performances at Dublin in La Boheme. Murphy performs in opera and musical theater and as a solo artist across Canada, the United States and Europe.

Ronan Scolard is a tenor and multi-talented musician from Dublin. He studied music at Trinity College, University of Dublin and is musical director and arranger at Trinity. His vast experience, including choral and orchestral work and arranging for Riverdance and Celtic Woman, has made Ronan one of Ireland’s most sought after arrangers and music producers.

Celtic Woman: Postcards from Ireland

Celtic woman set.

As we head towards the return of travel and live music, the Grammy-nominated ensemble Celtic Woman shares a message of love and hope with fans in the form of musical postcards, written with the songs from their latest album. They filmed their special at 14 locations in Ireland and are currently on the Postcards of Ireland tour, with March dates in Staten Island and New Brunswick, New Jersey. Stream the special TV concert now.

Breaking away from the usual format of Celtic Woman TV specials, Postcards from Ireland takes viewers on a musical journey through stunning land and seascapes across Ireland, where the set is filmed outdoors with musicians and dancers. Postcards appear throughout the program as signposts to keep you informed of location, and performers share associations they have with the setting or song they’re performing.

Irish places and songs

At Johnstown Castle in County Wexford in the East, the band deliver a stunning performance of ‘Amazing Grace’. Megaan sings “Bonny Portmore” at the Glendalough monastic site in County Wicklow. Admire the dramatic seascapes and cliffs of County Antrim, where the band perform a new rendition of ‘The Dawning of the Day’. ‘Beeswing’, a beautiful folk song, is performed in a reconstructed early 20th century Irish village in County Tyrone. The West Coast’s Wild Atlantic Way is pictured at Lissadell House in County Sligo, the holiday home of famous Irish poet WB Yeats. There, Muirgen sings “Down By the Salley Gardens”. At Kylemore Abbey in Connemara, County Galway, Chloe delivers a stunning rendition of ‘Angel’. In County Kerry, Tara performs Bach’s magnificent violin solo “Where Sheep May Safely Graze” in the medieval monastic ruins of Muckross Abbey. In the chapel of Trinity College Dublin, Susan offers a powerful interpretation of “May It Be”.

Mary Berry’s Simple Comfort: Ireland

A woman in a green blouse holds a piece of cake on a server;  the cake is on the table in front of her

Mary Berry.

The Great British Baking Show co-host Mary Berry has a PBS spin-off called Mary Berry’s Simple Comforts. In this episode, she visits Ireland, where comfort food is at the heart of local cuisine. Mary visits Cork’s local food market, which is full of culinary delights, from fresh fish and steaming stews to beautiful breads and the famous Boxty potato pancake. At the Jameson distillery, she meets a cooper (cooper) whose know-how has been passed down from generations of ancestors before him. Broadcast now.

The wild coast of Ireland


This unique journey along one of the world’s most spectacular coastlines showcases the wildlife and wild places that make Ireland’s rugged Atlantic coast so special. Wildlife cameraman Colin Stafford-Johnson is your guide to the place he calls home after 30 years of making the world’s most famous wildlife films. Watch clips and two episodes.

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Cameroon: A Magical Blend of Wonders https://schlammpeitziger.com/cameroon-a-magical-blend-of-wonders/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:09:35 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/cameroon-a-magical-blend-of-wonders/ Imagine a giant hand tearing off tiny pieces of every country in Africa, then collecting all the pieces in one place – well, that’s Cameroon. Known as “Africa in Miniature” – not for its size, which at over 475,000 km2 makes it the 53rd largest country in the world – but for its incredibly diverse […]]]>

Imagine a giant hand tearing off tiny pieces of every country in Africa, then collecting all the pieces in one place – well, that’s Cameroon. Known as “Africa in Miniature” – not for its size, which at over 475,000 km2 makes it the 53rd largest country in the world – but for its incredibly diverse geography, people, languages ​​and culture.

Even its history is diverse, undergoing many influences beginning with Portuguese explorers in the 15th century, becoming a German colony towards the end of the 19th century, and then split between Britain and France after the First World War. It became a federation and then finally, the Republic of Cameroon in 1984.

Triangular in shape, sitting at the crossroads of Central and West Africa, it neighbors Nigeria to the northeast, where Cameroon’s ever-changing landscapes meet the Atlantic Sea with a magical mix of mountains, desert plains , dense forests and mangroves.

To the east, it borders the Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea and Gabon, where the backdrop once again changes to tropical rainforests and savannah woodland. It is the largest but least populated region of the country. To the south, it borders the Republic of the Congo where the humid tropical forests and the plateau of southern Cameroon predominate.

This glorious chameleon-like environment, where every ecological and climatic system is embodied, comes with a multitude of flora and fauna. Over 8,000 types of plants have been recorded, along with over 400 species of mammals, and according to last year’s edition of the bible for twitchers – The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World – 965 species of birds were found. Add to that 250 reptiles and 200 amphibians and its biodiversity will take your breath away.

So who are the human inhabitants of this African gem? Of a population of over 27 million, only 10% are classified as indigenous peoples – the Pygmies, Cameroon’s earliest hunters and gatherers who still live in the slowly declining rainforests, the Mburo, who mainly reside along borders with Nigeria, Chad and the central region. African Republic, and finally the Kirdi communities, who live high up in the Mandara Mountains.

Add to that a melting pot of over 250 ethnic groups, including significant numbers of migrants from Nigeria and beyond, and you find a people as diverse as the country in which they live.

In a nod to its colonial past, English and French are the main official languages, but with so many ethnic groups, there are also over 250 dialects spoken. Its verbal diversity has earned it UNESCO classification as “distinctive cultural density on the linguistic map of the world”.

Rhythms as varied as the people

With such a disparate population, the beats and rhythms of Cameroon are as varied as the people, but among the many musical traditions, some have gained popularity across the country. Makossa, which originated in Douala – Cameroon’s largest city, perched on the Wouri River and one of Central Africa’s most prolific industrial centers – means “dance” and its funky sound, which has since developed the late 1960s, is exactly what it makes you do. . Over time, it merged with the sounds of Congolese rumba and, like the rest of modern African music, was influenced by new styles imported from the west.

Bikutsi music is also popular, with roots steeped in the traditional music of the Beti and Ewundo peoples, who live around the southern capital of Yaoundé. Wild and catchy dance music, it got its start outside Cameroon in the 80s and 90s when the legendary Têtes Brulées, with their half-shaved heads, stark white body paint and punchy electric sound, first appeared. on national television and then went on to perform across the world, including the rest of Africa, Europe, the United States and Japan, despite the untimely death of their bandleader and guitarist.

Perhaps the most famous representative in the world was Manu Dibango, who died two years ago. The charismatic jazzman, who excelled on the saxophone, became a star in France but also in Belgium, where he bonded with some of the giants of Congolese music.

Today, the urban music scene is dominated by Locko, who first rose to fame as the first Cameroonian to post cover songs on YouTube. In 2020, his aptly named seven-track album Locked Up kept him in the public eye.

With a claim to fame as Cameroon’s fastest rapper, KO-C made a bid for international fame with their first-ever UK tour last year. Cameroon still has a long way to go on the international scene, but emerging artists are starting to make an impact.

Eruption of contemporary art

The artistic influence of such a culturally rich country ranges from traditional royal wood carvings including thrones, figures and ceremonial masks, crafted with infinite skill by the Bamileke people, to an eruption of contemporary art that has received international acclaim.

Artists like Angu Walters, whose abstract and surreal drawings, mostly family-themed – showing in particular his reverence for mother figures and traditional village life – are exhibited around the world and his colorful and joyful canvases are a complete contrast to what is happening in front of his studio, based in the city of Bamenda.

Last year, the prestigious Goethe Institute honored Cameroonian Princess Marilyn Douala Manga Bell, the great-granddaughter of King Rudolf Douala Manga Bell, for her “highly valued ideas for overcoming colonial injustice and consolidating Cameroon’s own identity”.

She co-founded the Doual’art center more than two decades ago with her art historian husband and has been responsible for funding many important artistic projects, including the imposing sculpture The New Freedom, which rises 12 meters above the ground. high on Douala’s busiest roundabout. Created by the artist Joseph-Francis Sumégné, it addresses the contemporary issue of the environment and is entirely made from recycled materials.

There is a good literacy rate in Cameroon and it is no surprise that the country has contributed some of the continent’s leading thinkers. Authors like Imbolo Mbue, Patrice Nganang and the winner of the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens 2020, Djaiili Amadou Amal have successfully presented their stories outside of Africa. Food also plays an important role in Cameroon’s heritage, whether it’s the recipes passed down from generation to generation of people living off the land in rural communities or the migrants who cook their food as a way to preserve their culture. in a new country.

Most varied cuisine

Unsurprisingly, its cuisine is one of the most varied in Africa, from the traditional fufu, a dough-like dish made from fresh or fermented cassava, popular throughout West Africa, to the cultures brought by the colonization such as potatoes, tomatoes and sweet peppers.

One of Cameroon’s unofficial national dishes is Ndole, a belly-warming stew originating from the Douala tribe, traditionally prepared from boiled bitter leaves and groundnuts with seasoning and the addition of meat or fish.

Another is Kondre, from Bafang, a city at the heart of the Bamileke people. Originally a ceremonial food reserved for special occasions, its ingredients include plantains, tomatoes, onions, spices and meat.

Cameroonians, like most West Africans, love their food hot, but it seems Cameroon wins by producing the most mouth-watering pepe sauce, made with scotch bonnet peppers, tomatoes, garlic and garlic. other ingredients. It is used to give any dish or snack a zing that will blow your mind, but is delicious in fish or meat soup.

Finally, I must mention the national sport of Cameroon – football. Although they came late to the game in historical terms, they have qualified for the FIFA World Cup more often than any other African nation and have hosted the AFCON this year.

This article is part of a special feature supported by Stratline Communications and InvestauCameroun.com. Editorial content was commissioned separately and produced independently of any third parties.

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Anime Characters You Didn’t Know Were Based On Historical Figures https://schlammpeitziger.com/anime-characters-you-didnt-know-were-based-on-historical-figures/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 03:45:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/anime-characters-you-didnt-know-were-based-on-historical-figures/ Anime creators like to draw inspiration from real historical events and people for their work. Some shows have accepted the challenge of adapting real events from Japanese and world history, while others choose to reimagine well-known characters in a setting unrelated to their real life. RELATED: 10 Best Historically Themed Anime, Ranked Japanese animators are […]]]>

Anime creators like to draw inspiration from real historical events and people for their work. Some shows have accepted the challenge of adapting real events from Japanese and world history, while others choose to reimagine well-known characters in a setting unrelated to their real life.

RELATED: 10 Best Historically Themed Anime, Ranked

Japanese animators are especially fond of carrying their own cultural icons into anime, resulting in myriad shows about Oda Nobunaga. Other industry favorites are less obvious, like the countless animated iterations of Joan of Arc. Many of these references are prominently displayed, with the creators’ intent to use history as inspiration very evident. Still, some creators obscure their historical inspirations pretty well, and fans might have no idea what their favorite anime characters’ true prototypes are.

ten Jiro Horikoshi wasn’t a figment of Miyazaki’s imagination (The Wind Rises)


Japan’s WWII fighter chief engineer turned protagonist in Hayao Miyazaki’s film The wind picks up. The heartfelt historical drama doesn’t accentuate its factual origins, and many of the film’s admirers don’t even know the story was based on real life.

The film’s protagonist, Jiro Horikoshi, was a skilled Japanese aircraft designer and manufacturer. Despite his affiliations with the Japanese military, he was strongly opposed to the idea of ​​World War II. Miyazaki retained many elements of Horikoshi’s professional background in his film; however, most details about the protagonist’s personal life are completely fictional.

9 Ren Honjo was inspired by Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols (Nana)


nana and osaki and ren happy together

The handsome guitarist Ren Honjo from the classic shojo series granny shares many similarities with its actual prototype. Much like Sex Pistol bassist Sid Vicious, Ren has a dangerous drug addiction that jeopardizes his relationships and his career. Ren and Sid Vicious even share visual similarities, both being tall and lanky with attractive facial features.

The most prominent aesthetic similarity between the two is the locker Ren wears on his neck. The silver padlock with an R letter on it looks exactly like the one the Sex Pistol bassist had. In the show, Nana Osaki is the only person who has the key to Ren’s necklace.


8 Ash Lynx’s character design was based on River Phoenix (Banana Fish)


The author of Banana fish, Akimi Yoshida, has confirmed that Ash Lynx was primarily inspired by beloved American actor and musician River Phoenix. The similarities in appearance between Ash and his real-life counterpart are striking, as well as their tragic backstories.

RELATED: Banana Fish: 10 Ways It’s One Of The Saddest Anime

Like River Phoenix, Ash was abused at a young age and struggled to survive and earn money during his teenage years. River Phoenix’s passing in 1993 came as a shock to many, including Akimi Yoshida, as she even considered changing her manga’s ending. Nevertheless, the author decided that the only respectable way to end Ash’s story would be to fulfill his original plan. One year later, Banana fish ended with the death of Ash Lynx.


7 Eva Silver is the reimagining of Eva Braun, partner of Adolf Hitler (Seikon No Qwaser)


Seikon no Qwaser is a bizarre show in so many ways, from its puzzling supernatural plot to its shocking use of fanservice. The series experiments a lot with different historical elements and themes, with many of its characters being of Slavic origin.

The most unorthodox historical figure featured in Seikon no Qwaser is Eva Silver. The show confirms her true identity of being Eva Braun, Adolf Hitler’s real-life lover. However, Eva Silver’s personality seems to bear no resemblance to her historical inspiration, and even their physical similarities are rather unnoticeable.


6 Katsushika Hokusai’s daughter was portrayed authentically in an animated film (Miss Hokusai)


miss hokusai

The iconic artist behind the legendary Great Wave off Kanagawa painting, Katsushika Hokusai, is internationally renowned. However, the 2015 animated film Miss Hokusai presents the famous artist from an unorthodox point of view. The story takes place from the point of view of Hokusai’s daughter, O-Ei, who was herself a real painter.

The protagonist has lived her whole life in the shadow of her father. His talent and skills have gone unrecognized. While the anime takes some creative liberties in telling O-Ei’s story, it is remarkably realistic in its depiction of the story, painting a melancholy picture of Miss Hokusai’s tragic life.


5 Kawakami Gensai was the historical prototype of Himura Kenshin (Rurouni Kenshin)


Rurouni Kenshin

The Meiji era was the era of samurai in Japanese history, which is why it is seen so often in anime and manga. The thrilling romantic adventures of Himura Kenshin, a brilliant former assassin who swore never to kill again, were not simply inspired by the historical setting.

At Rurouni Kenshin The protagonist was actually based on an infamous Japanese samurai Kawakami Gensai, one of the most skilled assassins of the Bakumatsu period. Gensai’s swordsmanship and unorthodox life story have made the samurai an inspiration for several anime characters.


4 The evil version of Isaac Newton is Emperor Dornkirk (Visions of Escaflowne)


Emperor Dornkirk

The ultimate fantasy romance anime antagonist Visions of Escaflowne hails from Earth, where he was known as the scientist behind the discovery of gravity, Isaac Newton.

RELATED: Escaflowne’s Vision & 9 Other ’90s Anime That Deserve A Reboot

After his death, the famous scientist found himself on Gaea. Newton established an industrial society, the Zaibach Empire, on his barbarian land. The fictional version of Newton is not faithful to his real-life counterpart and takes almost nothing from the English physicist except his appearance and background. Nonetheless, Emperor Dornkirk is a fascinating example of historical references present in the anime.




3 A famous English novelist meets Ciel and Sebastian (Black Butler)


black butler arthur

Black Butler: Book of Murder OVA follows an intriguing murder mystery plot and features an unrecognized young author named Arthur as one of its characters. The humble but passionate writer is none other than Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the Sherlock Holmes novels.

The anime depicts him as an insecure struggling gentleman with a considerate, if unassertive, personality. Arthur’s professional tribulations actually resemble the journey of his historical counterpart, as the real Arthur Conan Doyle also struggled to get his writing career off the ground.


2 Char Aznable shares similarities with a historical ace pilot (Mobile Suit Gundam)


Char Aznable enjoys the war in Mobile Suit Gundam

The historical origins of Gundam franchise are not as apparent as in other anime. Nevertheless, the characters of the cult series of classic mechas had real historical figures as the basis of their personality. For example, the legendary villain of GundamChar Aznable, was created with German WW1 soldier Manfred von Richthofen in mind.

Von Richthofen was a highly trained Air Force pilot who shared a similar nickname with Char Aznable. The historical “Red Baron” became the iconic “Red Comet” in the anime.


1 The character of Gintama has completely reinvented its historical counterparts (Gintama)


Hijikata Drinking Mayonnaise

While many animated series draw inspiration from the past to write their characters, the author of Gintama was one of the few to completely reinvent its historical references. The real people who inspired Hideaki Sorachi have been exaggerated to the point that even a history buff would struggle to recognize them.

The satirical gag anime plays with its sci-fi premise set in Edo-period Japan by naming its cast after real samurai and historical politicians. However, in the Gintama universe, famed Vice Commander Shinsengumi Hijikata Toshizo turns into a mayonnaise maniac, and brave nobleman Saigo Takamori becomes an overly emotional transvestite.

NEXT: Gintama: The 10 Best Samurai, By Strength

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Atif is the most streamed Pakistani artist on Spotify internationally https://schlammpeitziger.com/atif-is-the-most-streamed-pakistani-artist-on-spotify-internationally/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 05:59:40 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/atif-is-the-most-streamed-pakistani-artist-on-spotify-internationally/ Nearly a year ago, Spotify, the world’s most popular streaming platform, entered the Pakistani market with a commitment to help local artists reach new fans and build careers, both in country and abroad, thanks to its tools and functionalities which allow the discovery of artists. 365 days later, Spotify celebrates its first anniversary by unveiling […]]]>

Nearly a year ago, Spotify, the world’s most popular streaming platform, entered the Pakistani market with a commitment to help local artists reach new fans and build careers, both in country and abroad, thanks to its tools and functionalities which allow the discovery of artists. 365 days later, Spotify celebrates its first anniversary by unveiling how Pakistani music is being discovered and enjoyed around the world.

Pakistani artists have found a global stage

According to data from Spotify, more than 19,590 songs have been added to the platform by creators in Pakistan over the past year. Among the 184 markets, with 406 million listeners worldwide in which Spotify operates, the top countries listening to Pakistani music are India, the United States and the United Kingdom.

Spotify data also revealed who are the most streamed Pakistani artists outside the country. Atif Aslam has become the most listened to Pakistani artist abroad, with his hits Kadi Te Has Bol with Velo Sound Station, Jeena Jeena (Badlapur) and Tere Sang Yaara ranking in the top 10 most listened songs of Pakistan abroad.

Acclaimed Pakistani singer Rahat Fateh Ali Khan was the second most streamed Pakistani artist overseas, and his uncle, the legendary Qawwali maestro, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan came third. Momina Mustehsan took fourth place and Bilal Saeed came fifth.

Baari by Bilal Saeed and Momina Mustehsan, the ultimate love song for millions of listeners, won first place as the most listened to local song abroad. The power duo made another appearance with Uchiyaan Deewaraan in fourth place, and Momina Mustehsan came in ninth place with Adnan Dhool in Awari. Plus, hits from rap duo Young Stunners Guman, Do not worry with Rap Demon and Afsanay came third, seventh and eighth respectively.

Local genres are exported around the world

Pakistani music crossing borders has had another notable moment in the past year, with 11% of the Pakistani indie genre airing in the US, seeing growth of more than 150% globally in the past year. . Additionally, Pakistani Electronic is gaining momentum locally and internationally, with 23% of the genre streamed in the US, Canada, UK and Germany, paving the way for a 223% increase in global streams. since the launch of Spotify.

Talking about how things have changed for him since Spotify entered the local scene, Turhan James, a Pakistani electronic music producer, said, “I’m so happy to see my music being heard so much since the launch of Spotify in Pakistan. Personally, I think it was a complete game-changer for our music industry. The platform gave artists the opportunity to showcase their work to millions of people, not just in Pakistan but around the world, while giving listeners the ability to consume music they would never encounter. It’s been a blessing!”

Local hip-hop was also among the most popular genres overseas. More than 63% of the genre’s streams came from outside the country and saw a growth in global streams of nearly 70%.

Spotify Streaming Trends in Pakistan February 2021-February 2022:

Top Local Artists Streamed Outside Pakistan:

1. Atif Aslam
2. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan
3. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
4. Momina Mustehsan
5. Bilal Said
6. Shafqat Amanat Ali
7. Talha Anjoum
8. Talha Yunus
9. Asim Azhar
10. Young stunners

Pakistan’s Best Songs Streamed Abroad:

1. Baari- Bilal Said, Momina Mustehsan
2. Pehli Dafa – Atif Aslam, Shiraz Uppal
3. Guman – Young stunners
4. Uchiyaan Deewaraan -Bilal Said, Momina Mustehsan
5. Kadi Te Has Bol – Atif Aslam, Velo Sound Station
6. Jeena Jeena (Badlapur)- Atif Aslam
7. Do not worry – Rap demon, young stunners
8. Afsanay – Young stunners
9. Awari – Adnan Dhool, Momina Mustehsan
ten. Tere Sang Yaara -Atif Aslam

Do you have something to add to the story? Share it in the comments below.

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Children’s book focuses on the ‘gold medal dreams’ of Olympic champion and Navy vet Billy Mills https://schlammpeitziger.com/childrens-book-focuses-on-the-gold-medal-dreams-of-olympic-champion-and-navy-vet-billy-mills/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 01:31:39 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/childrens-book-focuses-on-the-gold-medal-dreams-of-olympic-champion-and-navy-vet-billy-mills/ An Olympic official throws a towel at Marine Corps Lt. Billy Mills after finishing 14th in the marathon at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Days earlier, Mills had beaten 37 of the world’s top endurance runners to the gold medal. gold in the 10,000 meters with a record time of 28 minutes, 24.4 seconds. (Stars and […]]]>

An Olympic official throws a towel at Marine Corps Lt. Billy Mills after finishing 14th in the marathon at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Days earlier, Mills had beaten 37 of the world’s top endurance runners to the gold medal. gold in the 10,000 meters with a record time of 28 minutes, 24.4 seconds. (Stars and Stripes)

A Native American and former Marine who won a gold medal at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics is teaming up with an author and illustrator to publish a children’s picture book about his life.

In one of the biggest upsets in sports history, Billy Mills, then a 26-year-old Navy lieutenant, set an Olympic record of 28:24.4 over 10,000 meters to win gold on October 14, 1964. .

“10,000 Meter Thriller – MILLS SCORES UPSET” proclaimed the front page of Stars and Stripes after the race. The story described the victory – the first for the United States over this distance – as “one of the greatest shocks of all time” and said no one expected the young Marine to beat the Australian favourite, world record holder, Ron Clarke.

Fifty-eight years later, Mills, 83, of Sacramento, Calif., is collaborating with author Donna Janell Bowman and Native American artist SD Nelson to produce an autobiographical picture book titled “Wings of an Eagle: The Gold Medal Dreams of Billy Mills”. ”

The book will chronicle Mills’ experiences as an Oglala Lakota child growing up orphaned on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and the events that led to his dream of winning an Olympic gold medal, according to a statement from the February 4 from Running Strong.

The group, founded by Mills in 1986, partners with nonprofit organizations to provide grants to Native Americans to improve their self-reliance and self-esteem.

Marine Corps Lt. Billy Mills finished 14th in the marathon at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Days earlier, he beat 37 of the world's top endurance runners to gold in the 10,000 meters with a time record of 28 minutes, 24.4 seconds.

Marine Corps Lt. Billy Mills finished 14th in the marathon at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Days earlier, he beat 37 of the world’s top endurance runners to gold in the 10,000 meters with a time record of 28 minutes, 24.4 seconds. (Stars and Stripes)

The Olympic champion’s life story was featured in the 1983 film “Running Brave”, starring Robby Benson. Mills also co-wrote “Wokini: Your Personal Journey to Happiness and Self-Understanding” with bestselling author Nicholas Sparks.

Bowman is the author of award-winning children’s books, including “Step Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World About Kindness”, “Abraham Lincoln’s Dueling Words” and “The Sioux: The Past and Present of the Dakota, Lakota” . , and Nakota.

Nelson, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, is the award-winning illustrator and author of numerous children’s books, including “Black Elk’s Vision”, “Gift Horse”, “The Star People” and “Buffalo Bird Girl”, the statement said.

Mills’ new book will be published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers in the summer of 2024, according to the release.

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Here’s who’s in town for the NBA All-Star Game halftime https://schlammpeitziger.com/heres-whos-in-town-for-the-nba-all-star-game-halftime/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 18:49:00 +0000 https://schlammpeitziger.com/heres-whos-in-town-for-the-nba-all-star-game-halftime/ CLEVELAND – The NBA has released details of a halftime special show which will take place during the NBA All-Star Game on Sunday, February 20 at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse. The star-studded ceremony will feature special performances that honor the league’s 75th anniversary. Take the fans on a journeySpike Lee, eight-time Grammy Award winner and co-owner […]]]>

CLEVELAND – The NBA has released details of a halftime special show which will take place during the NBA All-Star Game on Sunday, February 20 at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse. The star-studded ceremony will feature special performances that honor the league’s 75th anniversary.

Take the fans on a journey
Spike Lee, eight-time Grammy Award winner and co-owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers Usher, five-time Academy Award winner and two-time Emmy Award winner, Tiffany Haddish, Grammy Award and Emmy Award winner, and Anthony Anderson, Emmy Awards, will tell a special tribute in honor of the 75-year history of the NBA. Players who pioneered the league over the years will be recognized.

The tribute will highlight “the themes that have served as cornerstones of the NBA since its founding: competition, culture and inclusion.”

The introduction
Cleveland native Machine Gun Kelly and famed producer DJ D-Nice will present the 2022 NBA All-Stars before tipping.

Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Machine Gun Kelly performs during day one of the Bud Light Super Bowl Music Fest Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022 at Crypto.com Arena in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

Macy Gray, a four-time Grammy winner and native of Ohio, will sing the national anthem of the United States, and Ryland James, a native of Toronto and a two-time Juno and platinum nominee, will sing the national anthem. from Canada.

Half-time final
Earth, Wind and Fire, winners of nine Grammy Awards, will perform their hit “Shining Star”.

Verdin White, Ralph Johnson, Philip Bailey

Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

From left, Verdin White, Ralph Johnson and Philip Bailey of Earth, Wind & Fire perform during the Drive-in Race to Erase MS event at the Rose Bowl, Friday, June 4, 2021, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

The First NBA HBCU
As previously announced, award-winning actress and TV personality Keke Palmer will perform the national anthem and “Lift Every Voice and Sing” before the start of the HBCU Classic premiere on Saturday, February 19 at 2 p.m.

She will be accompanied by the Howard University Showtime Marching Band.

Keke Palmer

Evan Agostini/Invision

Keke Palmer attends the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Benefit Gala celebrating the opening of the exhibit ‘In America: A Lexicon of Fashion’ on Monday, September 13, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

A star-studded musical program
DJ Khaled will be joined by Mary J. Blige, Ludacris, Lil Wayne, Gunna, Migos and Lil Baby to headline a performance ahead of the AT&T Slam Dunk on State Farm All-Star Saturday Night at 8 p.m.

RELATED: A Complete Guide to the 2022 NBA All-Star Weekend in Cleveland

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